Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover
Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover
Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover
Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover
Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover

Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover

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Trains of the Northeast Corridor Nelligan Hartley Soft Cover
 
Trains Of The Northeast Corridor By Tom Nelligan & Scott Hartley
Soft Cover
96 Pages
Copyright 1982

CONTENTS
I. The Northeast Corridor  4
II. Ancient History  8
III. Corridor Stations  22
IV. The New Haven  32
V. The Pennsylvania  46
VI. The Amtrak Era  66
VII. The Future of the Corridor  90

The piece of railroad that is the subject of this book didn't officially become the Northeast Corridor until 1965. That, at least, is when the term first appeared, in the context of legislation known as the High Speed Ground Transportation Research and Development Act. That was a program of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society that proposed to use $90 million of goverment money to improve the passenger railroad between New York and Washington, and on a lesser scale the line between Boston and New York as well.
In those days the plan called for the Department of Commerce to fund new equipment for the Pennsylvania and New Haven Railroads. There wasn't yet a Department of Transportation, or a Penn Central, Conrail, or Amtrak. The phrase "Northeast Corridor" supposedly came from one planner's suggestion that a map of the project area, showing a long straight rail line with cities lined up along its entire length, looked like a drawing of a building corridor with adjacent rooms. That man may have been one of the last imaginative bureaucrats in Washington.
Over the next decade, as Metroliners and TurboTrains sped into life, as the Pennsylvania became the Penn Central and then the New Haven became Penn Central too, as Amtrak took over the whole show, the phrase "Northeast Corridor" became an essential part of railroading's vocabulary, eventually becoming the official name of the 456 miles of track of Pennsy and New Haven heritage. But it wasn't necessary to legislate the fact that the multiple tracks between Boston, New York, and Washington had long made up the country's busiest passenger railroad-and, until recently, one of its busiest freight lines as well. Before the days of the Air Shuttle and the Jersey Turnpike, before Conrail and Amtrak and cost overruns, there already was a Corridor.
The top half, the Boston-New York domain of the New Haven Railroad, was the Shore Line. Four-tracked and electrified west of New Haven, double-tracked and steam or diesel-powered to the east, the Shore Line was the best showcase for passenger railroading ever seen in New England. From brooding, columned South Station the New Haven's limiteds set forth: the Merchants, the Yankee Clipper, the Colonial. the Gilt Edge. The Shore Line Route took them on a straight course across Boston's southwestern suburbs and exurbs, through the mill towns of Attleboro and Pawtucket, and on into Providence where they paused briefly at an elegant old station beneath Rhode Island's capitol. Beyond Providence, the limited's passengers would get a quick look at Narragansett Bay as the train twisted through East Greenwich, and then notice a smooth acceleration as the train speeded across the pinebarrens and the Great Swamp of southern Rhode Island.

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