Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket
Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket
Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket
Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket
Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket

Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket

Regular price $55.00 Sale

Used


RailroadTreasures offers the following item:
 
Strasburg Rail Road in Color by Bell and Plant Morning Sun Books w/ dust jacket
 
Strasburg Rail Road In Color by Kurt Bell and Jeremy Plant Morning Sun Books
Hard cover with dustjacket 128 pages
Copyright 2015 FIRST printing

THESTRASBURG
Before the Tourists
While the legendary railroad raconteur, author and
photographer Lucius Beebe never had any connections to the Strasburg Rail Road he knew about it enough to mention it in his 1947 book Mixed Train Daily. In his words, "Only the reconstructed Strasburg in Pennsylvania still holds to a gage [sic] of 4'9" in a railroading universe gaged to the classic 4'8 1/2"," he continues, "the precise span between the wheels of Julius Caesar's war Chariots." Moreover, he compared the finances of the Strasburg to the Savannah and Atlanta, a small Class 1 with an operating revenue of $200,000 versus the Strasburg "whose cash income is $3,700 for a twelvemonth period."
Little did Mr. Beebe or anyone at the time envision the changes that would befall the little line in the heart of the Pennsylvania Dutch Country. By all accounts, the Strasburg Rail Road was an unremarkable 4.022-mile short line, (calculated to 3.763 miles of main line and 0.259 miles of yard trackage and sidings, plus 11.15 acres of land), in southeastern Pennsylvania. Its sole purpose was to connect the Homsher Mill's feed, coal and lumber yard business in Strasburg, Lancaster County, with an interchange at Leaman Place Junction, where the Pennsylvania Railroad's four-track Philadelphia Division main line passed through. The principal commodities were inbound coal, lumber, grain and feed, agricultural products and machinery and some less-than-carload (1c1) business. In an age still dominated by steam power on America's shortlines, it was also bereft of steam locomotion, having embraced internal combustion motive power in the 1920s.
But as the patriarchal "America's Oldest Short Line," the Strasburg Rail Road (SRR) is anything but ordinary. Once described by Railroad Magazine as the "Methuselah of short lines," the company's founding goes back to the country's earliest railroads during the first decade of the industry, starting alongside storied early roads like the B&O and the D&H. The Strasburg traces its humble beginnings back to its charter, created by an act of the Pennsylvania Legislature on June 9, 1832 (Bill No. 344). Its origins are attributed to railroad building fever of the era - the
construction of the nearby Philadelphia & Columbia Rail Road bypassed the town of Strasburg by some four miles. The effective reaction on the part of the residents of Strasburg was to apply for a charter for the right to build their own short line railroad to connect with the P&C. They feared that without a railroad connection, all commerce would be diverted from town with an adverse effect on the local economy. It was either sink or swim. Thus a "community" short line railroad was born.
The original group of 22 businessmen owned a total of 723 shares of stock. They hired Major Joshua Scott, the surveyor of the state-owned P&C, to conduct the SRR's survey. He laid out a route originating from the Public House of Jacob Hoover (now the Swan Hotel) on the west end of Strasburg, down the center of the Main Street of Strasburg, to leave town to the east, and to connect with the P&C at or near Leaman's Place (later shortened to Leaman Place).
Bids for grading the entire line were opened on December 11, 1834. Construction is thought to have begun the following year. Due to the Panic of 1837 the railroad grading likely began but no tracks were laid due to the lack of capital. By the time the roadbed had been graded to within 100 yards of
All pictures are of the actual item.  If this is a railroad item, this material is obsolete and no longer in use by the railroad.  Please email with questions. Publishers of Train Shed Cyclopedias and Stephans Railroad Directories. Large inventory of railroad books and magazines. Thank you for buying from us.

Shipping charges
Postage rates quoted are for shipments to the US only.    Ebay Global shipping charges are shown. These items are shipped to Kentucky and then ebay ships them to you. Ebay collects the shipping and customs / import fees.   For direct postage rates to these countries, send me an email.   Shipping to Canada and other countries varies by weight.

Payment options
Payment must be received within 10 days. Paypal is accepted.

Terms and conditions
All sales are final. Returns accepted if item is not as described.  Contact us first.  No warranty is stated or implied. Please e-mail us with any questions before bidding.   

Thanks for looking at our items.