Railway Age 1954 January 25 Weekly Straight Line engine cleaning
Railway Age 1954 January 25 Weekly Straight Line engine cleaning
Railway Age 1954 January 25 Weekly Straight Line engine cleaning

Railway Age 1954 January 25 Weekly Straight Line engine cleaning

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Railway Age 1954 January 25 Weekly Straight Line engine cleaning
 
Railway Age January 25 1954 Vol 136 No 4
CONTENTS
"Piggyback" transportation of truck trailers on what would be virtually a system-wide basis is being seriously considered by the New York Central. 11
Per diem hearings began last week before the ICC 11
Robert R. Young, who has made so much railroad news during his connection with the C&O, has made still more by his resignation from that company's chairmanship-which leaves him "free" to take active interest in "another carrier." 12
Revenues and expenses of railways for November and 11 months of 1953 36
RAILWAY AGE FORUM
"Piggybacks"-Are they a sound idea or a flash in in the pan? 45
C. L. Dearing, deputy undersecretary of commerce, seems to understand the situation confronting the country's common carriers far better than anyone else in a national Administration which, so far, has only made conditions harder, not easier, for such common carriers.  46
Roadway restoration -bringing cuts and fills back to standard cross section-is accomplished on the Santa Fe by special grading outfits equipped with large earth-moving machines. 47
Should the car distribution formula. be revised? Correspondents express both "pro" and "con" views. 50
A gas-turbine switcher is being built for the Army Transportation Corps as an experimental project. 52
"Straight line" cleaning permits Wabash shops to dismantle diesel engines, clean and repair parts, reassemble the engines, and reinstall them in locomotives, without reverse movement. 53
BRIEFS
About a quarter-million dollars more than it has for the current fiscal year is recommended for the Interstate Commerce Commission in President Eisenhower's fiscal '55 budget, which went to Congress January 21. The budget calls for a commission appropriation of $11.5 million, and proposes that it be made without specific allocations for work of the Bureaus of Safety and Locomotive Inspection.
A second annual fellowship program for selected employees of Class I railroads has been announced by the Federation for Railway Progress. Three $1,000 fellowships-enabling winners from eastern, southern and western railroad districts to pursue a year of study at an accredited university of their choice-will be awarded at the end of May. Additional information is available from the federation at 143$ K street. N.W., Washington 5, D.C., or from personnel offices of Class I railroads.
President Eisenhower has revoked an executive order issued by President Roosevelt in 1942 to exempt from the compulsory-retirement-at-70 rule all Presidential appointees who were then serving indefinite terms. The revocation becomes effective March 31. Allyn C. Breed, assistant director and former acting director of the Bureau of Locomotive Inspection, is one of the few government employees still continuing in service pursuant to the 1942 order.
Intercoastal common-carrier barge service between ports on the Pacific coast and ports on the Gulf of Mexico has not been shown to be "economically practical," I.C.C. Examiner Claude A. Rice has found in a proposed report in No. W-1055, Sub-No. 1. Accordingly, he has advised the commission to deny an application of Alaska Freight Lines for a certificate authorizing intercoastal operation "by use of towboats and barges."
Certificates or permits of some 590 motor carriers-all small operators, below Class I rank-have been revoked by the I.C.C. for failure to file annual reports for the calendar year 1951. The commission's action "followed repeated efforts to obtain reports from these carriers," according to a notice from George W. Laird, commission secretary. The missing reports had been due June 1, 1952.
Sale of the Norfolk Southern Bus Corporation, subsidiary of the Norfolk Southern, to the Carolina Coach Company has been approved by the I.C.C.'s Division 4.
The first shipment 280 tons of nickel concentrate from the Sheritt-Gordon mine-recently moved out of Lynn Lake, Man., over the Canadian National's new 144-mile extension from Sherridon. The nickel concentrate headed for Fort Saskatchewan, where it is to be stockpiled in preparation for opening of a new million-dollar processing plant.
Walter S. Franklin, president of the Pennsylvania, has been named to receive the Pennsylvania Award for 1953. The award, presented each year by the Philadelphia area chapter of Americans for the Competitive Enterprise System for "outstanding service to the competitive system in Pennsylvania," will be presented to Mr. Franklin on January 25 at the fourth annual dinner of the group in Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, Philadelphia.
More Americans will resit automobiles at home and abroad in 1954 than ever before, says Walter L. Jacobs, president of the Hertz Rent-A-Car System. Mr. Jacobs forecasts a 15 per cent increase in business for his firm over 1953, as "more and more businessmen are becoming acquainted with the convenience and economy of traveling long distances by rail or air and driving a rented car as their own at destination."
Steelmaking capacity of the United States at the start of 1954 was 124,330,410 net tons annually-the highest level ever achieved and an increase of 6,782,940 tons during 1953-according to the American Iron & Steel Institute. The new annual capacity figure is an increase of more than 32 million tons, or 35 per cent, in the eight postwar years, and a gain of over 52 per cent since 1940.
Telephone calls can now be dialed between San Francisco and Sacramento on the Southern Pacific's own telephone system. This intercity telephone dialing is the beginning of an SP program which will be expanded, and is one of the developments made possible by the 60,000 miles of new carrier circuits--a form of wired radio which the railroad has installed since the end of the war.
A Transportation Hall to cost $215,300, is part of the contemplated expansion of the physical plant of John Carroll University, Cleveland. Cost of the entire expansion program is estimated at $2,646,842, and work will begin as soon as funds are available. The university would coordinate all its campus transportation work, both military and academic, in the Transportation Hall.
"Railway Clerk"-official publication of the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks-is now an 81/2-in. by 11-in. magazine, a complete departure from its previous newspaper format. Faster reading and easier handling were prime considerations behind the switch to the new style.

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