Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover

Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover

Regular price $75.00 Sale

Used


RailroadTreasures offers the following item:
 
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
 
Jemez Mountains Railroads Santa Fe National Forest by Vernon J Glover
Soft Cover
77 pages
Copyright 1990?
CONTENTS
FIGURES
TABLES
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  iv
INTRODUCTION  1
SANTA FE NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY  2
The Cade San Diego Land Grant  2
Building the Santa Fe Northwestern Railway            3
Guadalupe Box  10
Operating a Lumber Company  12
Hard Times  23
Reorganization  24
New Mexico Lumber and Timber Company  31
The Final Years  35
CUBA EXTENSION RAILWAY  46
Cuba Extension Railway  46
San Juan Basin Railroad  49
Santa Fe Northern Railroad  49
Santa Fe, San Juan & Northern Railroad  54
CONCLUSION  59
APPENDIX A  60
APPENDIX B  64
REFERENCES CITED  74
FIGURES
1.   Sidney Weil in August, 19561
2.   General location map of the Cade San Diego Land Grant  2
3.   American Hoist & Derrick Company log loader  6
4.   Rio Grande trestle soon after its construction in early 19236
5.   The sawmill at Bernalillo soon after its completion in 1924  7
6.   Typical low pile trestle crossing an arroyo, circa 1923  8
7.   Guadalupe Box during the railroad era  10
8.   The large trestle leading to the Guadalupe Box tunnels  11
9.   The southern approach to the Guadalupe Box  12
10. Map of the Jemez Mountain Railroads  13
11. A steel log car of the SFNW in the summer of 1939 at O'Neil Landing  15
12. Teams of horses were still used to skid logs in the woods in 1932  15
13. Locomotive Number 101 approaching the scene of a derailment  16
14. Santa Fe Northwestern locomotive Number 101 at Bernalillo  16
15. Railroad and shop facilities of the White Pine Lumber                                                Company at Porter 17
16. A railroad trestle and dwellings scattered through the woods' at Porter  18
17. Don Hammond and his wife lived in this tiny cabin at Porter  18
18. New Mexico Lumber & Timber Company store and warehouse at Porter  19
19. Railroad trestle and buildings at Porter New Mexico, circa 1932  19
20. Santa Fe Northwestern Railway locomotive Number 103 at                                           O'Neil Landing  20
21. Details of SFNW locomotive Number 103, circa 1937 - 1941  21
22. The railroads in the upper canyon of the Cade San Diego                                               Land Grant  21
23. Santa Fe Northwestern Railway Number 2, a rail-auto conversion                                      of a Buick coupe  22
24. One of the rail-autos, probably at Porter, circa 1932  22
25. The log pond and a string of log cars at the Bernalillo sawmill,                                         circa 1927  23
26. Boyd Curnutte and Don Curnutte  24
27. Bucking a felled tree into logs twenty-feet long for skidding  25
28. Two caterpillar tractors skidding a log across soft ground  25
29. Power shovel on a tracked chassis  25
30. A large washout of a timber trestle  26
31. Santa Fe Northwestern locomotive Number 105 in the sawmill yards  27
32. Locomotive Number 106 of the Santa Fe Northwestern Railway  27
33. Converted Number 107 of the Santa Fe Northwestern                                                    Railway at Bernalillo  28
34. Locomotive Number 101 and the heavily rebuilt tender  28
35. Train of empty log cars climbing up the grade near Canyon,                                           New Mexico  29
36. The sawmill at Bernalillo about 1931  33
37. The railroad trestles along the Rio de las Vacas north of Porter  34
38. The spur railroad from the Rio de las Vacas into Ojitos Canyon  35
39. The New Mexico Lumber and Timber Company camp in Ojitos Canyon  35
40. Ojitos camp, circa 1937 - 1939  36
41. This early truck was coming down a canyon on a well-built roadway  37
42. A detailed view of one of the early log trucks, circa 1932  37
43. A "rail-auto' on the Santa Fe Northwestern Railway, posed on a                                        tall trestle  38
44. American Hoist and Derrick diesel loader at O'Neil Landing  39
45. Heisler locomotive Number 105 at Bernalillo  40
46. After a fire in the autumn of 1939, the Joaquin Canyon trestle                                       was rebuilt  41
47. Details of typical railroad trestle construction  42
48. View from the track approach to the Joaquin Canyon trestle                              construction  42
49. New Mexico Timber Company's last railroad locomotive at Bernalillo  42
50. The New Mexico Timber Company sawmill at Gilman, New                                            Mexico in 1968  44
51. A fully loaded Mack log truck emerges from the Guadalupe Box tunnels  45
52. Santa Fe, San Juan & Northern Railroad roadbed at Mile Post 28.5, near La Ventana  46
53. A washout along the Santa Fe, San Juan & Northern Railroad line to La Ventana  47
54. Foundations of the tipple at the opening of Cleary Mine at La Ventana  48
55. Site of Luciani Mine near La Ventana on October 27, 1973  51
56. Locomotive Number 377 of the San Juan Coal & Coke Company                                                                   at La Ventana  52
57. Locomotive Number 2 of the San Juan Coal & Coke Company                                             at La Ventana  52
58. Cleary Mine of the San Juan Coal & Coke Company, circa 1930 - 1932  53
59. Loading chute at Anderson Mine, west of La Ventana; October 27, 1973  55
60. Site of Anderson Mine, west of La Ventana; October 27, 1973  56
61. Abandoned hulk of San Juan Coal & Coke Company locomotive Number 2, circa 1938  57
62. Looking south from the Anderson Mine near La Ventana  58
63. The approach to the first tunnel in Guadalupe Box  59
64. Locomotive Number 101, a 2-6-2 type, of the Santa Fe                                    Northwestern Railway  60
65. Locomotives 101 and 103 at the scene of the derailment of                                      Number 103's tender  62
66. Santa Fe Northwestern Railway locomotive Number 107  62
67. A 3T Heisler, locomotive Number 105, of the Santa Fe                                        Northwestern Railway  63
68. An American Hoist and Derrick diesel loader working at O'Neil Landing  64
69. Pawling and Harnischfeger (P&H) tracked loader working at                                          O'Neil Landing  65
70. Bachelor quarters at O'Neil Landing during the winter shutdown,                                        circa 1939  65
71. Workers in camp at O'Neil Landing circa 1939  66
72. A log dump and several shanties at O'Neil Landing, circa 1939  66
73. Dumping a truck load of 16-foot logs at O'Neil Landing  66
74. Joe Goldberg reading in his bunk shack at O'Neil Landing, circa 1939  67
75. Work area at O'Neil Landing, circa 1939  67
76. Working on a Caterpillar tractor at O'Neil Landing  67
77. Kenworth and White log trucks at O'Neil Landing, circa 1939  67
78. Loading 32-foot logs at O'Neil Landing with crane and peavey  67
79. The truck repair shop area at O'Neil Landing, circa 1939  68
80. The truck repair shop at O'Neil landing, circa 1939  68
81. Don Curnutte, logging superintendent, in a quiet moment                                                   at O'Neil Landing  69
82. Walter Giles, the cook at O'Neil Landing  69
83. James F. Cooke at the O'Neil Landing truck shop, circa 1939  69
84. Track maintenance man Melisandro Martinez with his "speeder" or track motor car  69
85. A railroad section-car posed on one of the tall trestles along the Rio Guadalupe  70
86. Santa Fe Northwestern Railway locomotive Number 101                                         switching log cars  70
87. Log loader and crew at work during the summer of 1939 at                                          O'Neil Landing  70
88. Lumber company employees aboard a railroad speeder  71
89. A mechanic looks over the damage to locomotive Number 101  71
90. A diesel American Hoist and Derrick loader at O'Neil Landing  72
91. T. P. Gallagher, Jr., as a young man. "oiling around" the running gear  72
92. A Bucyrus-Erie Loadmaster at work in the woods  73
93. Unloading Class Lg-1 log cars at the Bernalillo millpond  73
94. A Caterpillar tractor skidding a very large log with a Hyster steel arch  73
TABLES
1. Officers of Companies Connected With the Timber Operation  14
2. Santa Fe Northwestern Railway Rolling Stock, June 1931  30
3. Telephone Rings for New Mexico Timber Company  31
4. Officers of the New Mexico Lumber and Timber Company  32
5 Locomotives of the Santa Fe Northwestern Railway  61
6. Locomotives of the San Juan Coal & Coke Company  63
INTRODUCTION
The story of the railroads which penetrated the vast expanse of the rugged Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico is both a history of the land and a saga of men with great ambitions. The land, long inhabited the Jemez Indians, was conquered by Spanish invaders, only to be taken over a few centuries later and exploited again by American businessmen. With them came the railroads that were so necessary to support the industrial practices of the time in lumbering, mining, and general land development.
Both of the railroads chronicled in these pages were built during the boom years of the 1920s and, in the flamboyant style of the times, they were expected to prosper beyond any rational bounds. Both lines cost, in fact, far more to build than even their most optimistic traffic projections ever could have justified; and they operated in the shadow of constant financial difficulties.
The two lines were far longer, and thus more expensive to run, than comparable railroads operated by similar enterprises in New Mexico. In addition both industries served by the railroads -- coal and lumber -- were extremely competitive. Supplies were plentiful, prices fluctuated wildly, and customers changed suppliers frequently over small fluctuations in price, quality, or delivery schedules.
Neither railroad was able to achieve efficient operations or attain a steady income. Whenever traffic volume reached high levels, something always happened to cause a shutdown. Over the years costs remained high, markets weakened, and one after another the companies failed, even after reorganizations and infusions of new capital. By 1941 both railroads had become obsolete, and were abandoned.
Nevertheless, the early promoter of the railroads, Sidney Weil, has been confirmed as a man of vision. From the vantage point of fifty years, we can easily see that much of what he envisioned and advocated did indeed come to pass. But it only happened many years after his railroads were gone.

All pictures are of the actual item.  If this is a railroad item, this material is obsolete and no longer in use by the railroad.  Please email with questions. Publishers of Train Shed Cyclopedias and Stephans Railroad Directories. Large inventory of railroad books and magazines. Thank you for buying from us.

Shipping charges
Postage rates quoted are for shipments to the US only.    Ebay Global shipping charges are shown. These items are shipped to Kentucky and then ebay ships them to you. Ebay collects the shipping and customs / import fees.   For direct postage rates to these countries, send me an email.   Shipping to Canada and other countries varies by weight.

Payment options
Payment must be received within 10 days. Paypal is accepted.

Terms and conditions
All sales are final. Returns accepted if item is not as described.  Contact us first.  No warranty is stated or implied. Please e-mail us with any questions before bidding.   

Thanks for looking at our items.