Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket

Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket

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Jay Cooke’s Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin NP The Sioux Panic of 1873 w dust jacket
 
Jay Cookes Gamble by M. Jon Lubetkin Northern Pacific Railroad, The Sioux and the panic of 1873
Hard Cover with Dust Jacket
380 pages
Copyright 2006
CONTENTS
List of Illustrationsix
List of Tablesxi
Prefacexiii
Introductionxv
1. "God's Chosen Instrument"3
2. "The Northern Pacific Must Be Built"15
3. "Free from Fatigue"26
4. "The Buffalo Will Dwindle Away"43
5. "Knee Deep in Mud"52
6. "No System Observed"65
7. "Stop Firing at Me"80
8. "The Army of the Glendive"93
9. "The Fear of Red Skins"114
10. The "Battle of Poker Flat"131
11. "Falstaff's Ragamuffins"148
12. "20,000 Hostile Indians"162
13. "Looks Like War!"175
14. "Under the Whiskey Curse"187
15. "All Down There Are Killed!"241
16. "Strike Up Garry Owen"253
17. "We Do Not Anticipate Any Trouble"268
18. "Get Out, Gentlemen, Get Out"283
Postscript: "Ho Hechetu!" (It is Well!)294
Appendix: Lt. Edward J. McClernand's Account of the Rescue of the
1871 Western Yellowstone Survey301
Notes305
Bibliography341
Acknowledgments365
Index369

ILLUSTRATIONS
FIGURES
Jay Cooke, ca. 1875
Following page 200
Ulysses S. Grant
Henry D. Cooke
William G. Moorhead
Ogontz, Cooke's mansion
W. Milnor Roberts
Thomas H. Canfield
Samuel Wilkeson
Western reconnaissance party, 1869
J. Gregory Smith
Edward C. Jordan
Ira Spaulding and his staff
Ground-breaking ceremony at Carlton, Minnesota, 1870
1850 Vermont Central Railroad stock certificate
Minnesota-Dakota NP reconnaissance party, 1869
Vermont Central Railroad train wreck, 1864
Two sketches by Montgomery Meigs
NP engine no. 9
Interior of a St. Paul & Pacific Railroad passenger car, ca. 1875
Engraving from railroad stock certificate "Progress" (engraving, ca. 1850)
Rosser and surveyors at Fargo, North Dakota, 1872
Capt. Javan B. Irvine
Basil Clement
Joseph N. G. Whistler
Sketch of Heart Butte by Charles Graham
Little Missouri River
Upper Yellowstone River
Pryor's Creek
Brainerd roundhouse, ca. 1872-1873
NP train crossing the Red River at Fargo-Moorhead
Controversial "new" Brainerd depot built in 1872
Two NP construction photographs
George Armstrong Custer, ca. 1865
Col. David Sloane Stanley, ca. 1880
Rosser with his children, ca. 1873
Hailstone Creek
Gall
Sitting Bull
View of Big Hill Pompey's Pillar, 1873
White Bull
Rain-in-the-Face
Army Scientific Corps, 1873
NP advertisement in Philadelphia Inquirer, August 16, 1873
Luther P. Bradley
Location of Custer's charge, August 11, 1873
Sketch of Custer's camp, September 9, 1873, by Montgomery Meigs
Charles H. Fahnestock
J. Pierpont Morgan
Newspaper sketch, September 18, 1873
Surveyors' reunion, January 1906
Thomas Rosser at about 70
Gall's grave
Jay Cooke at 80
MAPS
1871-1872: Northern Pacific/Jay Cooke-Controlled Railroads in                              Minnesota73
1871-1872 Western Yellowstone Surveying Expeditions90
1871 Rosser-Whistler Eastern Yellowstone Surveying Expedition-                                   Eastern Half106
1871 Rosser-Whistler Eastern Yellowstone Surveying
Expedition-Western Half107
1872 Rosser-Stanley Eastern Yellowstone Surveying Expedition-                                       Eastern Half124
1872 Rosser-Stanley Eastern Yellowstone Surveying Expedition-                                  Western Half125
Pryor's Creek, August 14, 1872136
1873 Yellowstone Surveying Expedition: Western Dakota and                                           Montana196
Ambush of Custer, August 4, 1873245
Custer Position on August 10 and Morning of August 11, 1873257
Initial Sioux and Cheyenne Attacks, August 11, 1873258
Stanley's Initial Arrival and Custer's First Moves, August 11, 1873261
Final Indian Attacks/Custer and Stanley Counterattacks,                                                      August 11, 1873262
TABLES
1. Growth of Railroad Mileage in the United States, 1830-187329
2. Regional Railroad Mileage in the United States, 1841-187230
3. Kingsley Bray's Estimated Teton Sioux (Lakota) Population History,                                 1805-188146
4. Military Posts and Indian Agencies, Department of Dakota, 1869-                                      187350

TABLES
1. Growth of Railroad Mileage in the United States, 1830-187329
2. Regional Railroad Mileage in the United States, 1841-187230
3. Kingsley Bray's Estimated Teton Sioux (Lakota) Population History,
1805-188146
4. Military Posts and Indian Agencies, Department of Dakota, 1869-187350

DUST JACKET INTRODUCTION:
If 1869 Jay Cooke, the country's leading banker, was revered as "the Financier of the Civil War" and was, at age 48, bored with just making money. After being rejected as secretary of the treasury, the brilliant but idiosyncratic Cooke again decided to do something challenging: finance the Northern Pacific, a transcontinental railroad planned from Duluth, Minnesota, to Seattle.
M. John Lubetkin tells how Jay Cooke's gamble reignited war with the Sioux, rescued George Armstrong Custer from obscurity, created Yellowstone Park, set off a wave of Northern European immigration, pushed frontier settlement 400 miles westward, halted western Canada's drift into the U.S. orbit, triggered the Panic of 1873, and spurred J. P. Morgan's rise.
But Cooke, who staked his reputation and wealth on the Northern Pacific, did not anticipate inept and dishonest company management nor realize the extreme challenges of crossing 125 miles of Minnesota swamp. He failed to understand he couldn't control Congress and was unprepared for the financial and political coalition that confronted him. Most of all, Cooke underestimated the determination of Sitting Bull's Sioux and Cheyenne followers to continue living and hunting as they had in the past.
Cooke was soon whipsawed by the railroad's woeful planning, questionable contracts, and shoddy construction and by Minnesota's early winters. Morgan undermined him at every opportunity, and the CrMobilier scandal ended congressional support. When railroad surveyors and army escorts ignored Sitting Bull's warning not to enter the Yellowstone Valley, Indian attacks-combined with alcoholic commanders-led to embarrassing setbacks on the field and in the nation's press.
Finally President Grant turned to the soldier he most distrusted-Custer, who was soon locked in combat with Crazy Horse and Gall, as well as his immediate superiors. However, it was Custer's pen, not his sword, that Cooke would rue.
Yet, sustained by his conviction that he was "God's chosen instrument," Cooke never gave up. By September 1873 Bismarck was reached, the Northern Pacific's revenues exceeded expenses, and track was planned to the Yellowstone. Then Custer's melodramatic report of the fight on the Yellowstone reached the New York press. Within hours the news jolted Wall Street.
Lubetkin's suspenseful narrative describes events played out from Wall Street to the Yellowstone and vividly portrays the soldiers, engineers, businessmen, politicians, and Native Americans who tried to build or block the Northern Pacific.

On the front: A Northern Pacific work train and crew, likely on the Dakota prairie, ca. 1873. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

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