Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio

Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio

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Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised editio
 
Introduction to Mathematical Analysis, An by Frank Loxley Griffin Revised edition  Name on front page, writing (looks to be pencil) inside back cover and last blank page
Included is Answers to Exercises in An Introduction to Mathematical Analysis (27 pages)
Hard Cover
Copyright 1936
546 pages
CONTENTS
A PRELIMINARY WORD TO STUDENTS  1
CHAPTER I. FUNCTIONS AND GRAPHS   3                                                                                      
Some fundamental problems of variation: rates, mean values, extremes, zero values.
CHAPTER II. As TO EXACT RELATIONSHIPS . . . . 40                                                           
Formulas; kinds of functions. Some basic ideas analyzed: instantaneous rates, tangents, areas, etc., as limits.
CHAPTER III. DIFFERENTIATION   73                                                                                     
Derivatives of polynomials and u. Rates, extremes, etc.
CHAPTER IV. INTEGRATION  119                                                                                            
Area, volume, momentum, work, fluid pressure, falling bodies, etc.
CHAPTER V. TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS. . . . 148                                                           
Solution of right and oblique triangles. Applications.
CHAPTER VI. LOGARITHMS ........ 187        
Numerical calculation. Compound interest. Triangles.
CHAPTER VII. EXPONENTIAL AND LOGARITHMIC FUNCTIONS      233                                 
Compound Interest Law. Logarithmic and semi-logarithmic graphs. Laws discovered. Differentiation and integration: log u, e, uv, u/v.
CHAPTER VIII. RECTANGULAR COORDINATES. . . 270                                             
Motion. Analytic geometry: line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola; translation; pencils of curves.
CHAPTER IX. SOLUTION OF EQUATIONS  328                                                    
Determinants; loci. Quadratics: b2 - 4 ac. Rational roots of higher equations. Homer's and Newton's methods. General algebraic functions.
CHAPTER X. POLAR COORDINATES AND TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS   366           
Definitions. Radians. Periodic variations. Derivatives.
CHAPTER XI. TRIGONOMETRIC ANALYSIS. . . . 396                                                                  
Basic identities. Equations. More calculus. Involute. Cycloid. Damped oscillations. Addition formulas. Sums and products, etc.
CHAPTER XII. DEFINITE INTEGRALS   419                                                             
Summation of "elements": length, surface of revolution, etc. Plotting a surface. Double integration. Partial derivatives. Simpson's rule.
CHAPTER XIII. PROGRESSIONS AND SERIES . . . . 441                                                                                         
A.P. and G.P. Investment problems. Maclaurin series. Binomial theorem. Further laws; least squares.
CHAPTER XIV. COMBINATIONS, PROBABILITY, AND STATISTICAL METHOD  468              
Pn,r.; Cn,r. Chance. Normal Probability Curve. Other distributions; averages; measures of dispersion.
CHAPTER XV. COMPLEX NUMBERS . . . . . . 500                                                                    
Definition. Geometric representation. Operations. Roots of unity.
EXERCISES FOR REVIEW  513
APPENDIX  523                                                                                                                                                                    
Some proofs. Some standard formulas. The idea of "infinity." Use of a protractor. Table of integrals. Some important constants. Numerical tables: constants; roots; logarithms, base e or 10; trigonometric functions, radians and degrees.
ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS. . . . . . . 542
INDEX543
(Introduction) A PRELIMINARY WORD TO STUDENTS
I. "What It is All About." In scientific work and in daily affairs, we frequently observe that some two things seem to be related - that any change in the one produces some corresponding change in the other. Often it is important to ascertain precisely how the one will change with the other.
To illustrate: the speed of a locomotive depends in part on the amount of fuel consumed. Just how will the speed vary with the consumption of fuel? The blood-pressure in a healthy person is different at different ages. Just how should the pressure vary with the age? How should the price of corn vary with the size of the crop? Or the cost of a reservoir with the capacity? Or the speed of development of a photograph with the temperature of the developer? And so on.
Mathematical Analysis makes a systematic study of many different modes of variation, discovers exact relations between varying quantities, and devises suitable methods of making any necessary calculations. It has played a leading part in the modern development of the exact sciences and is being used extensively in other fields - the biological and social sciences, psychology and medicine, engineering, and business administration.
The subject is a large one, and could be studied for many years without exhausting it. But the introduction given by the present course will provide mathematical tools adequate for many kinds of scientific work. Also - what is desirable as part of a liberal education - it will give some idea of the nature and power of modern mathematics, and its important place in modern life and thought.
II. Some Suggestions as to Methods of Study. No subject can be mastered by merely receiving instruction. One must study it actively for himself. Where possible, try to react on each new question, and to devise some plan of your own for dealing with it.
Before studying each new lesson think over the recent work. Recall it clearly. Then, after reading the assignment, reflect upon this, too; formulate briefly in your own words just what each new process is, what it does, and why it is valid. This will save you much time in working the exercises. Study with care the examples solved in the text, as these often cover elusive points. Rework such examples for yourself, with the book laid aside: then compare.
Now and then run rapidly over in your mind an outline of the course to date, in order to see each major topic in perspective. Re-read occasionally the "summaries" of preceding chapters. Make free use of the Index, pp. 543-546, and of reference material in the Appendix.
Practice quizzing yourself. That is, think of questions which might come up in class, and see whether you can answer them. (In the first few lessons some ideas for such questions are listed, to indicate what is intended by this suggestion.) If any point is not clear, make a note of it, and ask about it or look it up soon. Note carefully the exact meaning of each new technical term that is introduced. In short, "get into the game," actively.
Some effort may be required for a thorough mastery of the course, but the final achievement will be well worth it.

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