Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov
Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov
Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov
Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov
Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov

Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov

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Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse Joseph Strapac Softcov
 
Interurban Electric Locomotives From Baldwin-Westinghouse By Joseph A. Strapac
Softbound 158 pages
Copyright 2001
Contents:
Introduction
Class A Locomotives
Custom Built Locomotives
Short Cab Pre-B Locomotives
Class B Locomotives
Class D Locomotives
Class B-1 Locomotives
Class C Locomotives
Class E Locomotives
Class S Locomotives
Competitors And Imitators
The Survivors
Numeric Production List
Foreword
Virtually a mythological creature today, the interurban electric railway remains a cherished icon in American history, reminding us of a happier, more innocent time. Some unknown quantity of rail mileage in the U. S. and Canada can trace its heritage to the era of the interurbans. A few suburban transit systems (notably the South Shore in Illinois and Indiana) can trace corporate roots reaching back to the first days when wire was strung.
And in America's heartland-north-central Iowa-a hardy team of four railroaders actually operates an electric railroad in the year 2001 with its sole motive power representing the last revenue-producing examples of interurban electric locomotives from Baldwin-Westinghouse that are the subject of this book.
What were they, these quirky little machines that are now dwarfed by high-cube boxcars and modern diesel locomotives? Why were they built? What level of technology did they represent? How were they used? What was their geographical distribution around North America? Why do we have to go to Iowa-or visit scattered trolley museums-to view these interesting machines in an approximation of their natural habitat?
While a single book cannot provide comprehensive answers to every profound question, it is now possible to step back and take a general look at the history of the interurban electric locomotive, but the topic requires some limitations. The most obvious is that only the product of one builder (actually two companies working in close concert) is covered within this volume. The arch-competitor of Baldwin-Westinghouse, General Electric, built almost as many locomotives for sale to the same market in the same time period. We would hope to discuss GE locomotives in a future book.
Another limitation, not quite so apparent, is that not even every Baldwin-Westinghouse electric locomotive that was built will be found in these pages. The author attempted to limit coverage to just those direct-current locomotives that would have been at home on a typical interurban; only a couple of alternating-current machines have slipped in (see Chapter 3). Some locomotives built to the same general plans as the machines pictured in these pages were deliberately excluded; storage battery and steel mill locomotives are absent. There just was not room for every variety of small B-W electric locomotive, much less larger road locomotives.
So this book isn't about "electric locomotives" in general-it attempts to address the subject of interurban electric locomotives manufactured by Baldwin-Westinghouse over a forty-year period beginning in 1896 and ending in 1937. There were less than 190 of them, and the boom era for their manufacture extended for just a few short years between 1911 and 1920, when 56 percent of the consortium's entire production was sold.

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