Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover

Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover

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Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee Hard Cover
 
Indianapolis Union And Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee
Hardbound
230 Pages
Copyright 2017


CONTENT
Prefacevii
Acknowledgmentsix
Introductionxi
1. Early Indianapolis:
Settling "The West"1
2. The Railroad Arrives:
A New Travel Technology19
3. The Union51
4. The Belt: Another New Idea121
5. The City And Its Railroads185
Bibliography 219
Index 223

INTRODUCTION
THIS BOOK DISCUSSES the development of the steam railroads of Indianapolis and how they affected the urban form and character of the city, but the focus is on the two smallest ones: the Indianapolis Union Railway and the Indianapolis Belt Railroad. A basic resource for any railroad historian is The Official Guide of the Railways and Steam Navigation Lines of the United States, Porto Rico, Canada, Mexico, and Cuba. That being something of a mouthful, if one refers simply to the Official Guide, others in the railroad field, at least, will know of which one speaks. This "bible" is still published today as the Official Railway Guide and remains an important reference in the field of transportation and logistics. For historians, however, it is the trove of monthly issues, going back well over a century, which brings the past to life. The Official Guide is always a good place to start when researching the history of any given railroad.
Selected at random, the July 1963 Official Guide has the following entry among the fourteen railroads that appear on page 47:
INDIANAPOLIS UNION RAILWAY CO.
OPERATING
UNION PASSENGER STATION. UNION TRACKS.
INDIANAPOLIS BELT RAILROAD.
Following a list of general officers, the entry notes, "Line owned, 1.72. miles; line leased (Indianapolis Belt), 14.16 miles; total miles operated, 15.88. Locomotives, 12. This is a Co-operative Terminal Road providing terminal facilities and doing a switching business for the roads entering Indianapolis."
The IU Railway's entry in the Official Guide for June 1916 is, except for the corporate officers and modest differences in mileage and number of locomotives, exactly the same-the same wording, the same punctuation, and almost the same typefaces.
To people who sometimes go whole days without thinking about railroads, these notations in musty, long-out-of-date volumes would mean little. To others, they whet the appetite to know more. There are so few words in those entries, yet they communicate so much: corporate names, corporate relationships, names of important officers, mileage, locomotive fleet, services provided. Any of these could be a jumping-off point for further inquiry. Measuring no more than about two by three inches, the entries were far too small to include a map, but there is always a map available somewhere-in atlases, ICC valuation records, Sanborn Map Company fire insurance maps, city maps of all kinds and dates, railroad records, and in the archives of collectors of all things railroad.
So, what was the Indianapolis Union Railway? The two historically dominant railroads of the Midwest and the North-east-the Pennsylvania and the New York Central-came to be the owners, lessees, and/or operators of eleven of the sixteen rail routes that radiated from the Hoosier State's capital city. The New York Central had six of those routes, the Pennsylvania five. Of the remaining five, two were under the aegis of the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Norfolk & Western, the Illinois Central, and the Monon claimed one each. These roads would shape the rail map of Indianapolis, and for half of the nineteenth and most of the twentieth century they would also be a major factor in the shape, look, feel, and economic destiny of the city itself.

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