Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp

Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp

Regular price $15.00 Sale

Used


RailroadTreasures offers the following item:
 
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp
 
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp

CONTENTS
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1.Baltimore and Ohio Lines
2.New York Central Lines
3.Norfolk and Western Lines
4.Pennsylvania Lines
5.Other Lines
6.Cincinnati
7.Dayton and Springfield

INTRODUCTION
Southwest Ohio's early growth was tied to the Ohio River and its tributaries and, by the 1830s, to the Miami and Erie Canal. However, the laying of the first iron-sheathed wooden rails into riverfront Cincinnati in the late 1830s was a harbinger of the railroad boom to come-an event that would change the way goods were moved for the next century. The first rails in Southwest Ohio belonged to the Little Miami Railroad, incorporated in 1836. Building a railroad in this part of the state was not easy; bedrock was close to the surface, and the only level ground was either near the streams and rivers or on top of the hills. The Little Miami Railroad built up the Ohio Valley to Columbia and then north up the west side of the Little Miami River Valley. The initial plan was to meet the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad, building southwest from Sandusky on Lake Erie, at Springfield. By the time the Mad River Line reached Springfield, the Little Miami Railroad found that a connection at Xenia with the associated Columbus and Xenia Railroad offered even more opportunity.
Many early lines in Southwest Ohio opened as narrow-gauge railroads where the rails were 3 feet apart, instead of the 4 feet, 8 inches of standard gauge. Until the 1890s, there was a plan to link many of the narrow-gauge companies into a great narrow-gauge network extending throughout the Midwest. Adding interest to the railroads of southwest counties was the presence of wide-gauge lines, like the Atlantic and Great Western Railway and the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad (both 6 feet between the rails). The Cincinnati and Hamilton Railroad had still a different gauge-4 feet, 10 inches between the rails.
From a city so fearful that the newfangled steam locomotives would scare the horses that the city fathers forbade the locomotives in the downtown-instead requiring them to stop around Pendleton and let horses and mules pull the stagecoach-like cars into the city center-Cincinnati soon became a rail center. Railroad lines fanning out from Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield, and those connecting the towns along the Miami River Valley, led to development of suburban communities. As workers moved from the city centers, commuter passenger service became important. The railroad depot became the focal point of many towns. In the big cities, the depot became symbolic of the railroad company, and considerable emphasis was placed on designing an attractive structure-one that would draw more patrons. As Cincinnati and Dayton grew, it became favorable to construct union depots where the populace could conveniently board whichever line best served their travel plans, rather than seeking out separate, sometimes widely separated, depots. Separate freight and baggage stations were also typical of the big city. Separate passenger and freight depots were also erected in smaller cities like Hamilton and Middletown and in other towns where business was heavy. Smaller communities were well served by the classic combination depot where passenger, freight, and baggage facilities were combined under one roof.

All pictures are of the actual item.  If this is a railroad item, this material is obsolete and no longer in use by the railroad.  Please email with questions. Publishers of Train Shed Cyclopedias and Stephans Railroad Directories. Large inventory of railroad books and magazines. Thank you for buying from us.

Shipping charges
Postage rates quoted are for shipments to the US only.    Ebay Global shipping charges are shown. These items are shipped to Kentucky and then ebay ships them to you. Ebay collects the shipping and customs / import fees.   For direct postage rates to these countries, send me an email.   Shipping to Canada and other countries varies by weight.

Payment options
Payment must be received within 10 days. Paypal is accepted.

Terms and conditions
All sales are final. Returns accepted if item is not as described.  Contact us first.  No warranty is stated or implied. Please e-mail us with any questions before bidding.   

Thanks for looking at our items.