Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover

Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover

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Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp Soft Cover
 
Images Of Rail Railroad Depots Of Northwest Ohio By Mark J. Camp
Softcover 127 pages
CONTENTS
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1.Baltimore and Ohio Lines
2.New York Central Lines
3.Nickel Plate Lines
4.Other Lines
5.Reuse of Depots
Index of Photographs

INTRODUCTION
Northwest Ohio of the late 1800s rapidly became a crossroads of railroads intent on reaching Chicago, Detroit, and major cities along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. Here east-west lines of the Baltimore and Ohio; Lake Erie and Western; Lake Shore and Michigan Southern; New York, Chicago and St. Louis; Toledo, St. Louis and Western; Wabash; and Wheeling and Lake Erie cross north-south routes of the Baltimore and Ohio; Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton; Cincinnati Northern; Cleveland, Chicago, Cincinnati and St. Louis; Detroit, Toledo and Ironton; Hocking Valley; Pennsylvania; and Toledo and Ohio Central. The history of these lines extends back to the mid- to late 1800s.
To serve business, industry, and the traveling public, railroads established stations at regular intervals or selected sites along their lines. A station was a designated point along the line where trains might stop to conduct freight and passenger business, check for telegraphed orders, or to fuel and service locomotives. Most stations required some type of shelter from the elements-thus, the depot was born. The first depots often amounted to nothing more than a platform shelter, three-sided lean-to, or boxcar. Often a town grew up around the depot, eventually necessitating a larger depot. Some early depots served not only passengers, baggage, and freight, but also contained space for grain storage. A few offered living space for the agent's family, but this was not as common in Ohio as farther west, because most stations lay within already established communities with available housing.
Depots became symbols of respective railroads-a marketing tool. Lines employed an engineering staff to design functional structures. Many had bay windows affording the operator an unobstructed view up and down the track. An order board, either attached to the trackside of the depot or on a separate pole on the passenger platform, served as a signal to the crews on passing trains. The agent could adjust the position of the semaphore blades and/or lights on this feature to convey orders to the engineer and his crew. Standard plans developed for depots, towers, and accessory buildings based on the importance and size of a community. Smaller towns received combination depots that typically had a waiting room and freight room separated by an agent's office where tickets were sold and freight and baggage claims made. These buildings could be lengthened or shortened as need required. Separate passenger depots arose where passenger traffic was brisk. Across or down the track, a separate freight depot supplemented the passenger facilities. Towns served by two or more railroad lines and major cities may have had a union depot where railroads shared the passenger amenities. Outside architects might be commissioned to design such buildings. Where freight business was heavy, separate freight houses might handle inbound and outbound materials. Larger freight stations usually had offices at one end-the head house-and a long freight shed attached at the other.

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