Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,
Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,
Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,
Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,
Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,

Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,

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RailroadTreasures offers the following item:
 
Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway,
 
Images Of America Central Of Georgia Railway By Jackson McQuigg, Tammy Galloway, and Scott McIntosh
Softcover 127 pages

Contents
Introduction
one Highball: Passenger Service on the Central of Georgia Railway
two People are Central: The Faces and Places of the C of G
three At Work and on the Job: The Men and Women of the Central of Georgia
four All Places Large and Small: Yards and Shops of the Central
five On the Rails: The Diverse Rolling Stock of the Central of Georgia Railway
Acknowledgments
Resources and Selected Reading

Introduction
"Baseball's just a sissy game to anyone who's waved at passing trains."
-Poet Rod McKuen as quoted by Gene Tharpe in "Nancy Hanks Has Final Fling,"
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Sunday, April 25, 1971
The Central of Georgia Railway was in its twilight when the Nancy Hanks II made its last run from Atlanta to Savannah on Friday, April 30, 1971. The railroad that traced its roots and proud heritage to the Central Rail Road & Canal Company-which was organized in 1833 by a group of Savannah businessmen to support their city's port-had been acquired eight years before in 1963 by the much larger Southern Railway. By 1971, the Central of Georgia was well on its way to losing its identity and shared much of its executive management with the bigger railroad.
Those who knew Savannah surely saw irony in the passage of the Nancy Hanks II and the Central's marriage into the Southern Railway System. Southern could trace its heritage back to the South Carolina Canal & Rail Road of 1827, and the success of "Charleston's Railroad" helped to fuel the competitive fires that have always burned between Savannah and Charleston. It was the South Carolina Rail Road which had so alarmed Savannah leaders in the first third of the 19th century. Because of the South Carolina Rail Road's inland reach, Savannah's seaport lost much of its export traffic of cotton, lumber, naval stores, and other agricultural products to the wharves of Charleston. Construction of the Central, the city reasoned, would help Savannah retain its position as a major ocean port on the East Coast, just as it had been since well before the American Revolution. After all, it had been the S.S. Savannah which set out for Liverpool from her namesake city on May 22, 1819, becoming the first steamer to cross the Atlantic Ocean in the process.
Despite its late start when compared to the South Carolina Rail Road, the Central was a pioneer in its own right. It would be the first railroad in the state of Georgia when Irish workers began to construct the line in December 1835, and hopes for the new line were extremely high. Yet right from the start, the Central was woefully undercapitalized. For most of the years leading up to its merger with Southern Railway 128 years later, in fact, the railroad would find itself in a state of fiscal turmoil.
By 1837, the Irish track gangs had been replaced by African-American slave laborers. Change was in store for the company's name, as well; it was now known as the Central Rail Road & Banking Company of Georgia. This change in identity reflected that the company had gained banking privileges from the state, thanks to a modification of the railroad's charter by the Georgia Legislature, allowing the railroad to obtain badly needed capital dollars. Still, construction inland from the lowcountry was slow going; it took six years to complete 160 miles of track, well under 2 miles of track a month. The line finally reached the Ocmulgee River opposite Macon in October 1843.

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