History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan
History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan
History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan
History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan

History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan

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History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan
 
History of the Faringdon Branch and Uffington Station By Adrian Vaughan
Softcover 184 pages
Copyright 1979

Contents
Index to Figures & Tables
Introduction
Chapter 1.Setting the scene
Chapter 2.Construction
Chapter 3.Trains on Barrowbush Hill
Chapter 4.The Faringdon Management
Chapter 5.The Train Service 1870-1896
Chapter 6.Men on the Line
Chapter 7.Reconstruction at Uffington
Chapter 8.The Golden Age
Chapter 9.Locomotive Department
Chapter 10. The Splendour Fades
Chapter 11. Old Age
Appendices
1.Main line connections June 1864
2.Main line connections June 1887
3.Men's service records
4.Milk and passenger traffic at Uffington week ending 21.7.94.
5.Shunting at Uffington interfering with level crossing 21/23.7.94
6.Traffic receipts and revenue Faringdon 1903-1959
Traffic receipts and revenue Uffington 1903-1959
7.Main line connections 1914
8.Cost of working locomotives and rolling stock 1912 . .
9.Average wages of footplate crews Faringdon 1867-1872 .
10.Coal placed on locomotives Faringdon 1912
11.Maximum loads for branch locomotives 1902 and 1927 .
12.Main line connections September 1936

Introduction
The railway to Faringdon was built out of equal parts of local patriotism, concern for personal prestige and the desire to make speculative investments. It was nearly destroyed owing to its founders' mismanagement in times of hardship but survived to serve the town in better times by the intervention of a great railway company. In the hands of this company it served the area well through the summer of England's Imperial power, through the miserable winter of an enormous war and into a new age when its monopoly in local transport was first challenged. New forms of haulage slowly reduced the railway's popularity but the great company continued to operate it. Another war of even greater duration and ferocity than the last gave the line a new lease of life but when peace was declared the railway sank swiftly to lower levels of use than had ever been known. It carried on in a dreamy twilight until the death of the great company brought darkest night and a new master. Three years later the branch went into a coma ending in death twelve years later, 104 years after its conception.
During the first fifty years, it encouraged trade and industry in Faringdon when the town's population was declining and in the age of the petrol engine it was working quietly away in the background carrying the heavy traffic which road hauliers could not, or would not, handle. Elderly residents of Faringdon remember the line now for a variety of reasons. Mr Wheeler said, `As a young man just after the first war I used to go to the football at Swindon and then to see a show. I didn't have much money in those days and used to save the fare to Uffington by walking there and back along the line.' Picnic parties used the line as Mrs Hunt recalls: 'When we were very young and lived in Swindon, Mum and Dad used to take us fishing. I can remember going on the Faringdon line because Dad used to hire a lovely pony and trap at the pub near Faringdon station to take us to the Thames at Radcot bridge.'

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