History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC

History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC

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History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier 1920 HC
 
A History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad By Howard Douglas Dozier, Phd
197 Pages
Hard Cover
Published 1920
197 pages
indexed, color fold out map
AUTHOR'S PREFACE
THIS volume owes its existence to a suggestion of Dr. Arthur S. Dewing, formerly of the Economics faculty of Yale Uni, now of the Harvard, that the consolidation of a number of short railroads along the South Atlantic Seaboard into the Atlantic Coast Line System illustrates well the growth of the holding company period of American railand its decline. To determine to what extent this is true the work was originally undertaken. It soon became evident that the location of the early constituent roads was determined by the geographical influence of the fall line, and that they, when once built, had a peculiarly marked influence on the economic conditions of the section of country through which they ran.
As the work progressed it seemed worth while to broaden somewhat its scope and to make a study of the history of the road with the economic history and economic condiof the section as a background. The results of this study were submitted to and accepted by the Yale faculty as a dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. With changes and additions they now appear in permanent form and may be summarized as follows:
The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad is the result of the consolidation of more than a hundred railroads stretching along the Atlantic Coast from Richmond, Virginia, to Fort Myers, Florida. The period of consolidation came later than in the case of most other railroad systems, due to the retarding influences of the Civil War, followed by those of the panic of 1873. From an historical point of view chief interest centers in the roads connecting the towns between Richmond and Wilmington - the Richmond and Peters-burg, the Petersburg, and the Wilmington and Weldon Railroads. Of these, the Richmond and Petersburg, twenty-two miles long, was the parent company. A short and pros-. perous line, it acquired the Petersburg, a longer and less prosperous neighbor, and became the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad of Virginia. This in turn acquired a system of roads of greater mileage than itself, the Atlantic Coast Line of South Carolina, also the Wilmington and Weldon Rail, and was rechartered as the Atlantic Coast Line RailCompany. Farther south the Savannah, Florida, and Western developed from a large number of unsuccessful roads into a successful system and was purchased outright by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. The last important acquisition was that of the majority of the stock of the Louisville and Nashville. Control of this system, secured by accident rather than design, has proved profit. Neither the original parent company nor any of its successors has ever undergone a reorganization.
Though constructed originally for local purposes, these lines developed into a continuous system and became the main thoroughfare of north-and-south travel, thus entering into competition with steamship lines. Only when acting as a unit could the roads meet successfully this competition. They collected produce at the fall line towns and carried it overland, partially supplanting water transportation. When physical connections were made, gaps closed, and the gauges standardized, through trains were possible. These enabled farmers along the route to grow the perishtruck crops and fruit in addition to the staple, cotton. By marketing cotton and naval stores, and by developing the trucking industry, the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad has rendered its greatest service to its patrons.
The author is indebted to Dr. Arthur S. Dewing and to Professor L. D. H. Weld, formerly head of the School of Business Administration of Yale University, now head of the Department of Commercial Research of Swift and Company, for helpful suggestions in the early stages of the study; to Professor Arthur W. Shelton, formerly head of the School of Commerce of the University of Georgia, now with the Interstate Commerce Commission, for reading the entire manuscript and offering valuable criticisms; to many officials of the railroad company for aid in securing inotherwise unobtainable, especially to Mr. Lyman Delano, vice-president, for access to all records and docuin the general offices of the company at Wilmington, North Carolina; to Mr. H. L. Borden, vice-president and secretary, for first-hand information, and to Mr. Samuel B. Woods, formerly assistant to general counsel, for a copy of a statement with regard to the road filed with the InterCommerce Commission; to Professor C. W. Doten, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for reading the manuscript and suggesting improvements and for a careful reading of the proof; most of all, to my wife, who helped in collecting much of the material, assisted in its presentation, did all of the typing, read the proof, and willingly underwent the sacrifices of the years of graduate study while the work was being done.
H. D. D.
Dartmouth College
Hanover, New Hampshire
January 1, 1920


Contents
I.Early Trade And Transportation ConOf The Atlantic Seaboard States 1
Ii.Economic Background Of The North And
South Railroads Of Virginia10
Iii.The Petersburg And The Richmond And
Petersburg Railroads Before 186022
Iv.North Carolina And The Wilmington And
Weldon Railroad Before 186048
V.The South Carolina-Georgia Territory And Its Railroads Before The Civil War 67
Vi.Summary Of Railroad Conditions Along The
Atlantic Seaboard To 186083
Vii.Growth From The Civil War To 1902102
Viii.Integrations And Consolidations138
Ix.Summary And Conclusion160
Appendix165
Bibliographical Note183
Index191
Maps And Table
Map Showing North And South Railroads Of
Virginia And North Carolina In 186023
Map Showing Railroads (A.C.L.) Of South
Carolina And Georgia In 186067
Table Of Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
System164

A History Of The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
Chapter I
Early Trade And Transportation
CONDITIONS OF THE ATLANTIC SEABOARD STATES
THE Atlantic Coast Line Railroad is one of the five principal railway systems of the South.' It owns and operates a system of roads in the states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, amounting to 4661 miles of line.2 In addition to this, it owns the majority of stock of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company,3 which owns and operates 7507 miles of line. These two roads lease the Georgia Railroad. Through this lease the Atlantic Coast Line and the Louisville and Nashville control fifty per cent of the stock of the Western Railway of Alabama and forty-seven per cent of the stock of the Atlanta and West Point Railroad Company. Through direct ownership of additional shares they exercise control over fifty per cent of the stock of the latter road.
The territory served by the Atlantic Coast Line may be conveniently divided into three main sections; that of Virginia, that of North Carolina, and that of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. In Virginia the lines run north and south connecting the fall line towns. The parent road, the Richmond and Petersburg, was chartered in 1836, and was operated till 1867 as a small local line running between Richmond and Petersburg, twenty-two miles.' The Petersburg Railroad Company was incorporated in Virginia in 1830 2 and in North Carolina in 1831. In 1898 the Richmond and Petersburg purchased the Petersburg Railroad and became by change of name the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company of Virginia.
In North Carolina the only road of importance was the Wilmington and Weldon. This was an outgrowth of the Halifax and Weldon, chartered in 1834 5 and consolidated in 1837 with the Wilmington and Raleigh, which also had been incorporated in 1834,6 and in 1855 became by change of name the Wilmington and Weldon.? This line also runs north and south and connects the Roanoke and Cape Fear sections of the state. In 1900 the Wilmington and Weldon, with other roads, was consolidated with and into the Atlantic Coast Line of Virginia to form the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company.
In the South Carolina-Georgia-Florida territory two systems developed; the Atlantic Coast Line of South Carolina, and the Savannah, Florida and Western, popularly known as the "Plant System." The general direction of these roads is east and west. The Atlantic Coast Line of South Carolina was incorporated March 5, 1897,6 as the result of a consolidation of five roads : the Wilmington, Columbia, and Augusta, chartered in 1846 as the Wilmington and Manchester; the Northeastern Railroad of South Carolina, chartered in 1851;" the Cheraw and Darlington,


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