History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket

History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket

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History of the American Legion, A by Richard Seelye Jones w dust jacket
 
A History of the American Legion by Richard Seelye Jones
Hard Cover with dust jacket  (HAS DAMAGE)
391 pages
Copyright 1946
SOUVENIR FIRST EDITION LIMITED AND SIGNED
Contents
ChapterPage
I Citizen-Veterans  15
Ii The Birth Of The Legion  22
Iii Principles, Problems And Procedures . . .  40
Iv Politics And Pressure  45
V The Legion Strove For Peace  60
Vi The National Defense  84
Vii Defense Becomes War 106
Viii The Care Of Disabled Veterans  122
Ix Pensions And Economy 143
X The Disabled Of A Second War 157
Xi The Battle For The Bonus  165
Xii The Bonus Is Paid  179
Xiii The Legion And Labor . . . . .. . .  191
Xiv Employment And The Gi Bill  207
Xv From The Grass Roots  224
Xvi Patriotism And Remembrance . . . . . .  236
Xvii In Time Of Disaster  245
Xviii Child Welfare  255
Xix The Young Idea  265
Xx Education Pro And Con  270
Xxi Un-Americanism  279
Xxii The Legion At Play  296
Xxiii Finances Of The Legion  308
Xxiv The Legion In Print  . 322
Xxv Ladies Of The Auxiliary  328
Xxvi Leaders Of The Legion  334
Xxvii Membership And Machinery  344
Xxviii After The Second War  354
Bibliography And Acknowledgments   361
Appendix A  363
Appendix B  371
Index   379
List Of Illustrations
First Legion Caucus at Cirque de Paris, March 17, 1919Frontispiece
Leaders in Forming the American Legion Facing page 30
Allied Commanders of World War I at Kansas City, 1921 . . .  31
Souvenir Taxicab of the Marne  31
The Legion Lobby at Work  64
Legion National Headquarters Building, Indianapolis  64
The Legion in Silk Hats  65
France Revisited, 1927  65
Charles McGonegal Demonstrates Iron Hands  96
Hospitalized Veterans Making Memorial Day Poppies  96
Indiana State War Memorial, Indianapolis  97
War Memorial Building, Little Rock, Arkansas  97
First World War Cemetery in the Argonne  128
Second War Cemetery near Cherbourg  128
Home of A. L. Shirley Post No. 176, Blue Hill, Nebraska . . .  129
Texarkana Post Home, Texarkana, Arkansas and Texas . . .  129
Open-air National Convention, Miami, Florida, 1934  160
Legion Donates German Cannon of 1918 to Scrap Drive . .   161
"40 and 8" Collects Playing Cards for World War II Troops . .  161
President Hoover Addressing Boston Convention, 1930     192
The Legion Debates Aid to Russia  192
President Roosevelt Signing the GI Bill of Rights  193
Legion on Parade in Paris, 1927  224
Legion on Parade in Milwaukee, 1941  224
Legionnaire Flannigan, of Hartford, pilots flood refugees, 1938.  225
Wisconsin Legion Flies Medicines to Ohio River Area. 1937. . .  225
"Happy" Wintz  256
Bill Robinson in Legion Parade, Boston, 1940  256
Drum Majorette, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, Post Band  256
Boys' State, Oregon, 1937  257
Sons of the American Legion Drum and Bugle Corps, Lake Worth, Fla.  ,  257
National Commander Edward Scheiberling at Chicago, 1944 . .  288
National Commander Belgrano, Miami, 1934  288
National Commander John G. Emery, of Michigan 289
National Commander Lynn U. Stambaugh, of North Dakota . .  289
Gen. George C. Marshall Receiving Legion's Distinguished Service Medal from Commander Waring, Omaha Convention, 1943 .  289
National Commanders Murphy, Spafford, O'Neil, Drain, Chadwick, Colmery, Kelly, Quinn, Johnson and McNutt  320
National Finance Committee, 1937-Colmery, Samuel, Ruddick, Reynolds, Smith and Dunlap  320
National Commanders Galbraith, Jr., MacNider, Owsley, McQuigg, Stevens and Doherty     321
Legion Key Men Glascoff, Barton, Griffith, Miller, Chaillaux and Creviston  352
Colonel Frank Knox  353
General Dwight D. Eisenhower  353
President Harry S. Truman  353
Admiral Ernest J. King  353
General Douglas MacArthur  353
DUST JACKET INTRODUCTION:
"Who started the American Legion? Nobody, and everybody. It sprang," Richard Seelye Jones writes, "from the comradeship of arms, one of the strongest ties that bind men together." The Yanks of 1917-1919 shared war experiences. They faced the problems of veteran-citizens. Some of them found common cause in the organization of their own American Legion. Will today's veterans stand with the Legion and make a united front under the principles of its 1919 constitution : "To uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States of America; to foster and perpetuate a one hundred per cent Americanism, to combat the autocracy of both the classes and the masses, to consecrate and sanctify our comradeship by our devotion to mutual helpfulness" ?
In the years that have passed since the American Legion was born in 1919 in Paris among soldiers of the first American Expeditionary Force it has faced knotty problems, won staunch supporters and discovered enemies. It has held a position of power-a power used to fight the veteran's peacetime battles. The question of the bonus, care of the disabled, and open opposition to radicalism and un-Americanism raised bitterly contested issues. Because the Legion was organized as a democracy with policies coming, not from the top down, but from the masses of membership up, there were tough battles, both internal and external. The new veteran's problems lie ahead but his way of meeting them is today's concern. Whether he supports or opposes the Legion's policies he needs an intelligent understanding of them as they have been formulated in the years between two World Wars. Mr. Jones's book gives just such a study of the Legion-unbiased ; clear-cut ; written with accuracy, humor and a vivid style.
Adopting a topical treatment, the author discusses the steps which led to the founding of the Legion, its principles, problems and procedures, its membership growth, the machinery of its organization, its finances and periodicals, its founders, its leaders, and its Auxiliary and other subsidiary groups. He sets forth the part it has played in national defense, in efforts for world peace, in disaster relief and child welfare, in memorials for the noble dead. He treats frankly the sometimes controversial relations of Legion and Labor. He tells how the Legion developed the "G.I. Bill of Rights." A delightful chapter describes the Legion at play.
A History of the American Legion is naturally the recital of the accomplishments of the World War I Legionnaire. His memory for past events in the Legion's colorful history will be quickened, and he will discover a great deal about the Legion that he never knew before. Richard Seelye Jones's is not an official history, but all the Legion's records and files were made available to him, and the distinguished Historical Advisory Commission, composed of Karl Detzer, Marquis James, Allan Nevins, Kenneth Roberts and James Street, read his manuscript and consulted with him. The Legion's national organization does not endorse or disapprove necessarily the author's interpretations and conclusions.

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