Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development

Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development

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Guide to North American Steam Locomotives Revised by Drury History development
 
Guide to North American Steam Locomotives compiled by George H Drury
Soft Cover
335 pages
Copyright 2015
CONTENTS
Foreword4
Introduction5
How steam locomotives work8
Wheel arrangements and types23
United States Railroad Administration48
Locomotive builders 52
Railroad-by-railroad listings (alphabetical) 57
Index -332
INTRODUCTION
The steam locomotive is the most fascinating machine yet devised. It was the first piece of industrial technology that was on public display: Steam locomotives came right into every town, and all their working parts were open to view. The men who ran them were visible and accessible, whether inspecting and oiling the machinery during a stop or seated in the cab. The romance of the locomotive was almost unbearable. The engineer's seat was at a throne-like height above ordinary people, and the train was a link to exotic places (or at the very least, the next town).
The romance has been explored and explained by others. What lies behind the romance is the development of a technology. Steam locomotives were the machinery of transportation factories, and each factory-each railroad-had its own ideas about the machinery it needed; rarely did two of them agree about the proper design. This book explores those designs and explains how they developed.
Locomotive development until 1900
The first locomotives, like Stephenson's Rocket of 1829, were contraptions. They had boilers, cylinders, and wheels, but each pioneering builder had his own ideas about placement of the components. By 1840 the conventions had been established: horizontal firetube boiler with firebox at the rear and smokebox and stack at the front, horizontal cylinders ahead of the driving wheels and usually outside the frames, a cab to shelter the engineer and the fireman at the rear, and, behind the cab, a car carrying fuel and water-the tender.
The typical locomotive of the 1860s and 1870s was a 4-4-0 weighing about 30 tons. It had a deep, narrow firebox (about 33 inches wide) set-between the driving axles, and a low-mounted, tapered boiler. Slide valves actuated by Stephenson valve gear routed saturated steam to the cylinders. It was a simple machine, sufficient for most duties. Other types in common use, usually for freight service, were the Ten-Wheeler (4-6-0), essentially a 4-4-0 with a third pair of drivers, and the Mogul (2-6-0). Locomotives were little changed from the designs of 1850, because there had been little need for change. Train length and weight were limited by the strength of couplers, draft gears, and underframes. Primitive braking systems and the lack of signals kept train speeds low. During that period there was considerable experimentation with various aspects of locomotive design. The net effect of most of it was to prove what wouldn't work.
Until about 1880 railroads generally bought locomotives designed by the builders. Then different lines began to need specialized locomotives, first choosing from designs offered by the builders, then developing their own. The result was that Alco and Baldwin could build identical 2-8-0s for Boston & Maine, but those 2-8-0s would differ greatly from 2-8-0s built for the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Denver & Rio Grande.
In the 15 years before 1900, railroad technology made several major advances. The Master Car Builders Association adopted the Janney automatic knuckle coupler in 1887 and the Westinghouse automatic air brake in 1889. Automatic block signals were coming into use. Steel was replacing wood for car underframes and, withir a few years, for entire cars.

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