Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands
Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands
Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands
Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands
Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands

Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands

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Great North Of Scotland Railway by HA Vallance V3 History rys Scottish Highlands
 
The Great North Of Scotland Railway by H. A. Vallance The history of the Railways of the Scottish Highlands Volume 3 REVISED edition
Hard Cover with Dust Jacket
218 pages
Copyright 1989
Contents
FOREWORD 9
FOREWORD TO 1989 EDITION 10
PHOTOGRAPH ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 11
1 AN AMBITIOUS START13
Rival schemes  parliamentary victory  the Aberdeenshire Canal
2 PROGRESS UNDER DIFFICULTIES19
Lack of capital  construction begun  opening to Huntly  the Waterloo branch
3 THE INEVITABLE SEQUEL29
The Inverness companies the junction at Keith  hoard room quarrels  the Highland Railway
4 THE MORAYSHIRE RAILWAY37
From Elgin to Lossiemouth  the Craigellachie extension through the Glen of Rothes  amalgamation with the Great North
5 THE BANFFSHIRE RAILWAY48
Early schemes  construction and opening  the Great North takes over
6 EXPANSION AND CONSOLIDATION53
The Keith & Dufftown Railway  through Strathspey  the Macduff line  the old Meldrum branch  into the Alford Valley - the Formartine & Buchan Railway  consolidation
CONTENTS
7 ABERDEEN JUNCTION CONTROVERSY67
Waterloo and Guild Street  two abortive schemes  the Denburn Valley line
8 THE DEESIDE RAILWAY 74
Formation of the company  opening to Banchory  extensions into Upper Deeside  leasing and amalgamation  Royal trains
9 CRISIS AND RECOVERY 87
Grave financial difficulties  towards better times  the Moray Firth Coast line  the Cruden Bay branch - continued progress  after fifty years
10 THE ROAD TO INVERNESS 103
Enterprise leads to warfare  a seven-year traffic agreement the long struggle continues  after the race to Aberdeen  the feud is ended
11 LIGHT RAILWAYS AND BUS ROUTES 117
An unpromising start  the St Combs branch  more fruitless schemes  pioneer bus services route mileage trebled tourist services  services during the war  after the war  the 1918 committee
12 YEARS OF MATURITY 129
Modernisation continued  enterprise ill-rewarded - the Highland amalgamation scheme  long-distance excursions  breaks with the past  train service developments  the Great North at war  the last years of independence
13 LOCOMOTIVES AND ROLLING STOCK 144
Daniel Kinnear Clark: 1853-185S  John Folds Ruthven : 1855-1857  William Cowan : 1857-1883  the Morayshire Railway  the Banffshire Railway  the Deeside Railway  James Manson : 1883-1890  James Johnson : 1890-1894  William Pickersgill : 1894-1914
Thomas Heywood : 1914-1922  rolling stock
14 UNDER LNER AEGIS168
After the grouping  Sunday services road services and competition  the Royal Commission on Transport  economic depression and recovery  staff changes  locomotive changes rolling stock changes  through war to nationalisation
15 BRITISH RAILWAYS AND RETRENCHMENT184
The first years  diesel replaces steam  the Beeching Report  goods traffic  track and signalling
16 NORTH SEA OIL AND THE FUTURE192
Oil to the rescue  charter trains  service improvements  Great North remains
APPENDICES199
1 Authorisation and opening dates for rail and road motor services
2 Doubling and singling of line
3 Closures
4 Route information
5 Officers
6 Summary of train services
7 Rolling stock
8 Non-GNSR locomotives
9 Selected altitudes
10 GNSR Association
INDEX213
One of the five fully-independent Scottish railways of the pre-grouping era, the GNSR was the only one including the world 'Great' in its title, and paradoxically it was the smallest. It was a compact little system, largely made up of branches, extending northwards and westwards from its headquarters in Aberdeen through predominantly agricultural countryside, fringed by fishing havens along the coast. Passengers and perishables were its chief sources of revenue. There was no heavy goods traffic, and it is not surprising that it never had any six-coupled tender engines. Another peculiarity was the absence of second class from the start. The best known branch was that to Ballater along which Queen Victoria was a regular traveller.
H. A. Valiance based his book upon original research, telling the story from the time of the Railway Mania until original publication in 1965. In particular he describes the financial problems in the early days (resulting in the western half of the main line from Aberdeen to Inverness becoming part of the Highland Railway) followed by progressive policies once stabalisation was achieved. The GNSR ran a particularly smart suburban service around Aberdeen, increasingly enterprising expresses, and carried much fish.


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