Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed

Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed

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Grand Canyon Railway Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall Signed
 
The Grand Canyon Railway, Sixty Years in Color by Al Richmond & Marc Pearsall
Soft Cover
112 pages
Copyright 2004
CONTENTS
Chapter One: The 1940s and 50s
Chapter Two: The 1960s and EARLY 70s
Chapter Three: The DORMANT YEARS, 1974-1989
Chapter Four: The REINAUGURALYEARS, 1989-1994
Chapter Five: The LATE 1990s into the 21st CENTURY
INTRODUCTION
The Grand Canyon Line...these four words became the hallmark of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway. Faded ghosts of this logo continue to be found on a dwindling number of overpasses and rotting box cars along the Burlington Northern Santa Fe from Chicago to Los Angeles. They evoke an image of Grand Canyon vistas and the world famous warbonnet livery that the Santa Fe used to attract passengers to the Titan of Chasms and its other colorful destinations in the southwestern United States.
When the Santa Fe arrived at the south rim of the Grand Canyon on 17 September 1901, thus began a romance with trains unequalled by any other railroad in the country. They hired artists who created hand colored black and white photographic images and magnificent oil paintings that for decades have lured thousands of passengers out of their drab, grey eastern cities to the far-flung multihued vistas of Arizona, New Mexico and California.
In 1938 the Santa Fe introduced color to railroading on an unparalleled scale with the inaugural run of El Capitan on 18 February. Trailing stainless steel Budd cars, EMC1 Number 6 made a spectacular entry to the Grand Canyon sporting its brand new red, yellow, silver and black livery that in very short order became Santa Fe's trademark...a trademark that remains recognized around the world today. Miraculously it survives to this day as part of BNSF's freight consists. How much longer it will endure is anyone's guess. But even when completely replaced by "pumpkins," the noses of BNSF's heritage fleet will sport a modified version of the warbonnet of yore.
Oddly enough, The Chief became the most recognized of all the Santa Fe name trains. When its first section preceded El Capitan on the 10th it did so in a less than spectacular fashion with a blue and white EMC demonstrator E-2 on the point. The Chief also came equipped with its own unique stainless-steel Pullman cars. Both trains stopped at the Canyon only this one time for the photo opportunities to promote both trains and The Grand Canyon Line. Thus began the Santa Fe's real love affair with color at the Canyon. However, it would be another eight years before color photography of trains on the Grand Canyon Railway by amateur and professional train watchers appeared with increasing regularity. For this we can thank the technological advances in photography wrought by World War II.
No matter how they arrived at Williams or the Canyon, these pioneering train lovers weaned themselves from black and white to the new, temperamental but durable print and slide films and recorded color images for posterity. Not many of these images of the Grand Canyon Railway survive from the 1940s, `50s, `60s and `70s. But with the arrival of the 1980s and reopening of the line became a possibility, more and more historians and railfans arrived at the railroad's doorstep in Williams and Grand Canyon and recorded its state of decay.
Since the reinaugural in September 1989, probably hundreds of thousands of color images in prints, slides and video have been taken by professional photographers, railfans, historians, passengers, and tourists from around the world. For sheer volume, this may well be one of the most photographed railroads in the world...and it is almost all in color.
As of the early 1970s Santa Fe's specials no longer visited the Canyon and so too did their colorful warbonnet disappear from the scene. That is until April 1990 when Santa Fe president Michael Haverty requested and received permission to transit the line with their historic stainless-steel business train. To everyone's delight he used this opportunity to further promote the warbonnet in regular Santa Fe service, albeit freight service, but service nonetheless. Newly repainted FP-45s Numbers 100 and 101 headed up this consist and when they met GCR No. 18 at the Grand Canyon and pulled into the depot, the circle had been rejoined. Color "Santa Fe style" was definitely back at the Canyon!
This Historic trip came about after two long years of planning, preparation, and rebuilding of the railroad. First rolling stock to arrive on the property came in the form of two former Santa Fe GP-7 road switchers, Numbers 2072 and 2134. They arrived dead-in-train with road numbers lined out and their blue and yellow freight livery looking a bit worse for the wear. It was immediately decided to repaint them in their original colors to honor their heritage but GRAND CANYON now replaced Santa Fe on the sides and nose. The new GCR was ready for business and railroad color eventually returned to the Canyon on 11 September 1989 when these two units arrived at the depot heading up a ballast train. In later years the Geeps' livery changed to all black with white lettering and 2072 even sported Santa Fe style "zebra stripes" for a short time before being sold.
Now everyone knows that most steam locomotives are "basic black." For the most part, GCR's are no different. Although for a time they sported white trim on wheels and walkways, and colorful banner heralds on the tenders, they have now reverted to basic black with graphite grey smoke boxes, red cab roofs and simple gold lettering. Gold lettered advertising of 1-800 THE TRAIN and www.thetrain.com on the tenders have now replaced Santa Fe's railroad esthetics in the struggle for passenger ridership.

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