Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered

Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered

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Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of UPs super powered
 
Giants of the West By George Cockle Pictorial presentation of Union Pacific's super powered locomotives
208 Pages  
Soft Cover
Copyright 1981
208 pages

Contents
Introduction5
Demonstrator 4500hp Gas Turbine14
"Baby" 4500hp Gas Turbine27
"Veranda" 4500hp Gas Turbine43
"Big Blow" 8500hp Gas Turbine58
Coal Burning 7000hp Gas Turbine89
B+B B+B "Whirlybirds" 5000hp U5od96
Twin Diesel "Roaring C's" 5000hp U50c114
Double Engined 5000hp Dd35a And B144
Alco Century Series 5500hp C855a And B162
"Centennial" 6600hp Dda4ox182

The Union Pacific Railroad has always been infatuated with operating fast, high-horsepower locomotives. To meet the widely changing climatic conditions coupled to challenging geography across the system, some of America's biggest road locomotives were designed and constructed for the Union Pacific.
Throughout the steam era, the operating demands of moving heavy freight quickly over the mountain ranges which separated the east end of the system from the west, placed increasing demands for more horsepower.
From the drawing boards came some of the most notable steam locomotive designs, including the unique three-cylinder 9000-class 4-12-2's, the simple-articulated 4-6-6-4 "Challenger," and the world's largest steam engine . . . the 4000-class "Big Boy" 4-8-8-4's.
The design criteria constantly demanded improvement in the speed and horsepower categories, closely followed by dependability and overall operating economy. In close cooperation with all major locomotive builders, the railroad's mechanical staff explored every new possibility in motive power development.
STEAM TURBINE DEVELOPMENTS
While steam operation reigned supreme over the first half century, a new stage was being set on the Union Pacific with the testing of the experimental General Electric steam turbine electric locomotive in 1939. For nearly two years, General Electric and Union Pacific design engineers planned and constructed this new-concept in motive power, completed in December 1938.
In a departure from the usual steam locomotive appearance, the two 2500-hp units were housed in car bodies similar to the early Streamliners. Basically, steam was generated to 1500 pounds pressure which operated a two-stage, cross-compound turbine. In turn, the turbine was geared to two direct current generators which supplied power to the six traction motors.
Extensive testing was conducted at General Electric's Erie Works prior to actual road testing on the New York Central in January 1939. After additional modifications, the two experimental steam turbine electrics were delivered to the Union Pacific .. . arriving on 4 April 1939.
After handling a wide variety of assignments, the engineering theories advanced in these two units did not measure up in actual road service. The closed air-cooled condensing system, designed to convert the generated steam back to reuseable boiler water, proved less than satisfactory on long haul assignments. The units were simply too difficult to maintain.
The units never entered regular service. With the tests considered a failure, they were returned to General Electric on 17 June 1939. While these two locomotives were built under contract for the Union Pacific, General Electric retained ownership.
In fairness to the steam turbines, it should be mentioned that they operated reasonably successful on the Great Northern Railway. Pressed into service in 1943, they helped relieve the wartime power shortage by operating short-haul freight assignments in the Pacific Northwest. By the end of 1943, after almost a year of road service on the Great Northern, the two units returned to General Electric in need of heavy repairs. After a thorough inspection at Erie Works, both locomotives were deemed not economically repairable and retired.

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