Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition

Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition

Regular price $300.00 Sale

Used


RailroadTreasures offers the following item:
 
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Arnold Kerr 1st edition
 
Fundamentals of Railway Track Engineering by Dr. Arnold D Kerr
Hard Cover
393 pages
Copyright 2003
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ChapterPage
FOREWORDix-xi
I. INTRODUCTION1
II. THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF RAILWAYS5
III. THE EVOLUTION OF TRACK COMPONENTS25
III.1. Ties25
III.2. Rail-Tie Fasteners for Wood Cross-Ties 51
III.3. Rail-Tie Fasteners for Concrete-Tie Systems67
III.4. Rails73
III.5. Rail Joints74
III.6. Turnouts82
IV. RESPONSE OF TRACK TO WHEEL LOADS84
IV.1. Introduction84
IV.2. Analyses of Longitudinal-Tie Tracks85
IV.3. Analyses of Cross-Tie Tracks86
IV.4. Validity of Used Analyses111
IV.5. Shortcomings of the Standard Analysis112
IV.5.1. Effect of Lift-Off of Rails or of Rail-Tie Structure112
IV.5.2. Effect of Base Stiffening on Track Stresses114
IV.5.3. Effect on Track Analyses of Ballast Resistance Against
Tie Rotation115
IV.5.4. Effect of Continuity of Ballast-Suhgrade Base on
Track Analyses117
IV.6. Rails-in-Track Subjected to Axial Forces118
IV.7. Contact Pressures and Their Effect on Rail Defects and Wear124
IV.8. Summary of Rail Stresses and Their Effects128
IV.9. Stress Concentrations129
IV.10. Fatigue of Rail Steel and Its Effect on Rail Fractures131
V. DETERMINATION OF THE RAIL SUPPORT MODULUS k
FOR THE STANDARD TRACK ANALYSIS135
V.1. Introduction135
V.2. The Kerr Method for Determination of k Using Any Car or Locomotive137
V.3. Other Proposed Methods for Determination of k141
V.4. Problems to Be Considered When Determining k148
VI. THE TRACK SUBSTRUCTURE153
VI.1. Subgrade; Engineering Properties and Problems153
VI.1.1. Grain-Size Distribution Curves153
VI.1.2. Soil Porosity and Water Content157
VI.1.3. Consistency and Sensitivity of Clay-Type Soils158
VI.1.4. Permeability of Soils, Seepage, and Drainage162
VI.1.5. Filtering Properties of Soils and Their Use164
VI.1.6. Capillary Phenomenon and Its Effect on Subgrade168
VI.1.7. Effect of Frost on Subgrade, Frost Heave171
VI.1.8. Soil Pressure, Pore Water Pressure175
VI.1.9. Subgrade Strength; Shearing Failures179
VI.2. Ballast184
VI.2.1. Introduction184
VI.2.2. Purpose of Ballast184
VI.2.3. Desired Properties of Ballast Layer185
VI.2.4. Qualification Tests for Ballast Materials186
VI.2.5. Effect of Ballast Gradation188
VI.2.6. Rock Types and Their Effect on Ballast Performance190
VI.2.7. Ballast Shoulders191
VI.3. Subballast and the Subgrade-Ballast Interface; Geotextile, Geogrids194
VI.3.1. The Subballast194
VI.3.2. The Subgrade-Ballast Interface196
VI.4. Track Drainage201
VI.5. Methods of Track Maintenance205
VII. THE AXIAL FORCES IN RAILS, TRACK BUCKLING,
AND PULL-APARTS209
VII.1. Introduction209
VII.2. Generation of Axial Forces in Rails210
VI1.2.1. Axial Rail Forces and Displacements in a Straight Rail
Caused by a Uniform Temperature Change AT.210
VII.2.2. Axial Rail Forces in a Straight CWR Track Caused by ATo212
VII.2.3. Axial Rail Forces in a Straight Jointed Track Caused by AT.217
VII.2.4. Axial Forces in a CWR Track Caused by a Pull-Apart218
VII.2.5. Axial Forces in a Turnout Caused by AT.220
VII.2.6. Axial Forces in Curved Tracks Caused by AT.221
VII.3. Track Buckling Tests and the Essential Findings223
VII.4. Static Analyses of Track Buckling; Straight Tracks227
VII.5. Static Analyses of Track Buckling; Curved Tracks235
VII.6. Parameters Needed for a Track Under Consideration237
VII.7. Numerical Examples239
VII.8. Rail Installation Temperatures and Maintenance in North America243
VII.9. Measures for Preventing Track Buckling244
VII.10. Additional Remarks to Track Buckling246
VIII. DYNAMICS OF TRACK-TRAIN INTERACTIONS AND RELATED PROBLEMS250
VIII.1. Introduction250
VIII.2. Definition of the Terms Velocity (Speed) and Acceleration251
VIII.3. Newton's Laws of Mechanics252
VIII.4. The Use of Newton's Laws for the Analysis of Simple Railway Engineering Problems253
VIII.5. Utilization of the Presented Examples for the Explanation
of Dynamic Railroad Situations264
VIII.6. Dynamic Problems at Track Transitions268
VIII.7. Remedies at Track Transitions272
VIII.8. Elimination of Track Transition Sections by Using Matched Pads275
VIII.9. Car Moving Over a Curved Track282
VIII.10. Conversion of Degree of Curvature to Radius, Numerical Example284
VIII.11. The Critical Speed of a Moving Car286
IX. DESIGN ANALYSES OF CROSS-TIE TRACKS289
IX.1. Introduction289
IX.2. Design Data290
IX.2.1. Allowable Bending Stress for Rail290
IX.2.2. Allowable Bearing Stress for Determination of Tie-Plate Size292
IX.2.3. Allowable Bearing Stresses for Tie on Ballast292
IX.2.4. Allowable Bearing Stresses for Subgrade293
IX.2.5. Comments to the Determination of Allowable Stresses293
IX.2.6. Speed-Effect Coefficient294
IX.2.7. Car and Locomotive Data295
IX.3. First Design Example296
IX.3.1. Example Statement296
.3.2. Preliminary Remarks296
IX.3.3. Determination of Rail Size296
IX.3.4. Determination of Tie-Plate Size299
IX.3.5. Check if the Largest Tie-Ballast Pressure 6m< aQ,J305
IX.3.6. Determination of Required Ballast Depth305
IX.4. Second Example308
IX.4.1. Problem Statement308
IX.4.2. Problem Analysis308
IX.4.3. Conclusions for Second Example309
IX.5. Third Example309
IX.5.1. Problem Statement309
IX.5.2. Problem Analysis310
IX.6. Alternate Method for the Determination of w,ax, p,ax, and M,ax312
X. MISCELLANEOUS TRACK PROBLEMS AND ANALYSES318
X.I. A Study of Options for Upgrading a Neglected Lightly Used Track318
X.2. Effect of Using Three-Axle Versus Two-Axle Trucks320
X.3. Effect of Inserting a Stiffer Tie in a CWR Track321
X.4. Effect of a Rail Pull-Apart on the Response of a CWR325
X.5. Effect of Rotational Fastener Stiffness on the Lateral Track Response331
XI. STEEL METALLURGY, RAIL MANUFACTURING, RAIL WELDING,
AND THEIR EFFECT ON RAIL PERFORMANCE337
XI.1. Elements of Rail Metallurgy337
XI.2. Rail Hardness Tests345
XI.3. Rail Steel Metallurgy and Its Effect on Rail Performance348
XI.4. Rail Manufacturing354
XI.5. Rail Welding359
XI.5.1. Common Welding Methods359
XI.5.2. Effect of Cooling Rates on the Weld Properties362
XI.6. Rail Problems and Maintenance363
XII. PUBLICATIONS REFERRED TO IN TEXT366
INDEX388
ABOUT THE AUTHOR393
I. INTRODUCTION
The evolution of railroad tracks that are presently in use began over 200 years ago. The early developments are described in Chapter II. The subsequent evolution of the various track components is described in Chapter III.
The main function of a track is to provide a durable, smooth, running surface for the trains and to disperse the large wheel loads to a sufficiently low pressure on the subgrade, the track's weakest component.
Generally, main-line tracks consist of three major parts (Fig. I.1).
TRACK STRUCTURE
SuperstructureSubstructureSpecial Structures
-Rails- Ballast- Bridges
-Ties- Subballast- Tunnels
-Fasteners-Subgrade- Culverts
-Turnouts and-Drainage facilities- Retaining walls
crossing diamonds
Fig. I.1. Elements of a track structure
The carrying capacity and long-term durability of a track depends largely on how the superstructure and substructure respond and interact when subjected to moving trains and to environmental effects (such as rain, frost, and temperature changes).
Railroad tracks evolved through trial and error. When the locomotive and car weights increased and began to noticeably damage the existing tracks, the railroad companies increased the cross sections of the rails and ties, and the depth of the ballast layer until the rate of the track deterioration diminished to acceptable levels. Further increases of locomotive and car weights again caused an increase in track deterioration rates and the railroads would respond accordingly. These cycles of train-load increases and the corrective measures taken by the railroads continue to this day.


All pictures are of the actual item.  If this is a railroad item, this material is obsolete and no longer in use by the railroad.  Please email with questions. Publishers of Train Shed Cyclopedias and Stephans Railroad Directories. Large inventory of railroad books and magazines. Thank you for buying from us.

Shipping charges
Postage rates quoted are for shipments to the US only.    Ebay Global shipping charges are shown. These items are shipped to Kentucky and then ebay ships them to you. Ebay collects the shipping and customs / import fees.   For direct postage rates to these countries, send me an email.   Shipping to Canada and other countries varies by weight.

Payment options
Payment must be received within 10 days. Paypal is accepted.

Terms and conditions
All sales are final. Returns accepted if item is not as described.  Contact us first.  No warranty is stated or implied. Please e-mail us with any questions before bidding.   

Thanks for looking at our items.