Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket

Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket

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Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III w/dust jacket
 
Forging the Bee Line Railroad 1848-1889 by Arthur Andrew Olson III
Hard Coverwith dust jacket
228 pages
Copyright 2017
Contents
List of Illustrationsix
Background and Acknowledgmentsxiii
Railroad Abbreviations Listxix
Prefacexxv
How the Bee Line Got Its Name1
The Bee Line to Big Four Flowchart4
The Atlantic and Great Western Railroads to Erie Railroad Flowchart5
Timeline of the Bee Line Railroads and Involved Lines6
Prologue: U.S. Transportation Policy and the                                                                    
Industrial Revolution: 1780s-1830s12
The Dawn of Midwestern Railroading:                                                                                                
An Indiana Example: 1832-185320
Push and Pull of the Cleveland Clique                                                                                              
and Hoosier Partisans: 1853-186856
National Aspirations and Financial Chicanery: 1860-187494
End of the Era: The Bee Line Fades from the Scene: 1874131
Epilogue: Bee Line Destiny-Cornerstone                                                                                                    
of the Big Four Route: 1874-1889137
Appendix A: Principal Characters List146
Appendix B: Representative Bee Line Locomotive Images173
Notes   178
Bibliography    212
Index221   
Illustrations
Map of the Eastern Trunk Lines' Approach to OhioFollowing page xxiv
Map of the Bee Line and Principal Midwestern RailroadsFollowing page xxiv
Fig. 1. Cleveland Railway Station and Docks, 1854xxvii
Fig. 2. The Bee Line Route & Surrounding Lines, ca. 186013
Fig. 3. Stephenson's "Rocket" Locomotive15
Fig. 4. Baldwin's "Tiger" Locomotive, 185617
Fig. 5. A Bee Line Taunton Locomotive Mfg. Co. Engine, Ca. 187017
Fig. 6. An Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Locomotive, 185619
Fig. 7. A Bee Line Cuyahoga Steam Furnace Co. Locomotive, ca. 1851    19
Fig. 8. Indianapolis and Union City Area Railroads, ca. 186022
Fig. 9. Indianapolis Railroad Depots, ca. 185231
Fig. 10. Indianapolis Union Station, Ca. 190632
Fig. 11. Route of the Indianapolis & Bellefontaine Railroad, ca. 185535
Fig. 12. Bee Line Kilgore-Styled Taunton Mfg. Co.                                                         Locomotive Advertisement53
Fig. 13. Union City to St. Louis Area Railroads, ca. 186060
Fig. 14. Route Map of the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, Ca. 1865, and Area Railroads, Ca. 186064
Fig. 15. Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge65
Fig. 16. Route Map of the Big Four, Ca. 1900144
Fig. 17. Cover Etching of a Bee Line Train145
Samuel P. Anthony146
John Brough147
Benjamin S. Brown148
John W. Burson148
William Case149
Selah Chamberlain149
John H. Devereux15o
John A. Dix151
Calvin Fletcher151
James H. Godman152
Jay Gould153
Truman P. Handy153
Richard Hilliard154
Reuben Hitchcock154
Leander M. Hubby154
Hinman B. Hurlbut155
Melville E. Ingalls155
Hugh J. Jewett155
Alfred Kelley156
Marvin Kent157
David Kilgore157
James E D. Lanier158
George B. McClellan159
James McHenry159
Thomas A. Morris161
William A. Otis162
Henry B. Payne162
Edwin J. Peck163
Joseph Perkins163
Rufus P. Ranney164
James B. Ray164
William Reynolds164
Chauncey Rose165
Don Josde Salamanca165
Daniel E. Sickles166
Jeremiah Smith166
Oliver H. Smith167
George Stephenson167
Robert Stephenson167
Amasa Stone Jr.i68
Oscar Townsend169
William H. Vanderbilt17o
Peter H. Watson171
Henry Wick171
Stillman Witt172
Daniel Yandes172
Simon Yandes172
Fig. A. CCC&I Locomotive #70173
Fig. B. CC&C Alabama Locomotive, ca. 1856173
Fig. C. CC&C Cincinnati Locomotive, ca. 1851174
Fig. D. B&I Galion Locomotive, ca. 1852174
Fig. E. CC&C Leonard Case Locomotive, ca. 1853175
Fig. E CC&C L M Hubby Locomotive, ca. 1867175
Fig. G. CC&C Louisville Locomotive, ca. 1851176
Fig. H. CC&C New Hampshire Locomotive, ca. 1854176
Fig. I. B&I Sidney Locomotive, ca. 1853177
DUST JACKET INTRODUCTION:
IN THE 1830s, as the Trans Appalachian economy began to stir and Europe's Industrial Revolution reached its peak, midwestern politicians and businessmen moved to capitalize on their grand vision for the future. Success of the Erie Canal as a link to East Coast markets whetted the appetites of midwesterners to join in America's expanding economic potential. Amid this perfect storm of technology, enterprise, finance, and timing rose the earliest of these lucrative conduits to reach the Eastern markets: the railroads.
By the late 184os three such vision-driven ventures had sprung to life. Two small railroads with confusingly similar names epitomized the enthusiasm of the era: the Indianapolis and Bellefontaine in Indiana and the Bellefontaine and Indiana in Ohio. Acting in concert, they attempted to connect with each other and the key midwestern hubs of Indianapolis and Cleveland-gateways to the East and West. Oliver P. Smith, founder of the Indiana line challenged Hoosiers to decide with their pocketbooks "whether the immense travel ... and business of the west should pass round or go through central Indiana."
Soon, these lines fell under the financial sway of the dominant regional railroad of the era-the Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati-which completed the envisioned two-city link. A clique of powerful Cleveland businessmen, bankers, and politicians leveraged on the lines to extend their reach to New York and St. Louis markets-drawing on Wall Street's newly emerging investment bankers to feed their increasing financial appetites.
Regardless of legal structure or official names, however, the lines between Cleveland and Indianapolis crystallized in the minds of the public as the `Bee Line:' The Hoosier Partisans, initial funders of the Indiana segment, pushed back against the increasing influence of the Cleveland Clique. Time and again they frustrated consolidation moves-exercising a degree of autonomy inconsistent with their dependent financial underpinnings. Ultimately, they acquiesced to the reality of their situation.
While the Civil War bolstered the financial health of the Bee Line, it also solidified the growing presence of eastern financier trunk railroads moving to extend their control westward. Even the Cleveland Clique fell victim to unscrupulous European and New York financial manipulators who assumed powerful roles amidst the Erie and Atlantic and Great Western railroads. Still, by the end of the era, the New York Central emerged to cement the Bee Line in place as the cornerstone of its newly configured network of midwestern railroads-thereafter known as the Big Four route.

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