Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket

Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket

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Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Woodhouse, Jacobson & Pete w/ dust jacket
 
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway by Phil Woodhouse, Daryl Jacobson and Bill Peterson
Hard Cover w/Dust jacket Reflections from the lights on some photos.
234 pages
Copyright 2000

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgments v
Chapter 1:  A Land Rich in Resources1
The 3S Railway 8
Chapter 2:  Construction Begins11
The Trout Stream in the Canyon  14
Hardware for the Railroad  21
The Wild West  23
The Rucker Brothers  25
Chinese Labor  30
The "Hundred-Year Storm"  31
Chapter 3:  The Railroad's Early Years35
Silverton  40
Another Fierce Winter  43
Preparing for Prosperity  48
The Rockefeller Reorganization  53
More of Nature's Wrath  56
A Rebuilt Rail Car  57
The Floods of 1896  59
A Brighter Outlook  61
Lime  65
The Storms of 1897  66
The Kissing Tunnel  69
Times of Confusion  70
The Rockefeller Power Play  72
Chapter 4:  The Northern Pacific Takes Over75
The Smelter Trust  76
New Management  78
A New Beginning  79
Mining Ends at Monte Cristo  81
Quieter Times  85
More Troubles  86
New Business, New Struggles  89
Toward a More Substantial Line  95
The Northern Pacific Pulls Back  99
Restored Service to Monte Cristo103
Chapter 5:  The Timber Industry and the Railroad111
The Silverton Nursery  112
Chapter 6:  The Hartford Eastern135
More Winter Problems  136
Safety First  138
World War I  139
Keeping the Line Open  140
Competition from the Automobile  142
The Inn at Big Four  143
A Real Power Play  144
New Owners  144
Abandonment  145
Epilogue: The Everett and Monte Cristo Railroad                                                                            Today  153
Appendix A: A Driving Tour: Hartford to                                                                                    Barlow Pass169
Appendix B: Roster of Equipment179
Everett and Monte Cristo Railway  179
Locomotives  179
Passenger Cars  180
Freight Cars  180
Maintenance-of-Way Equipment  180
Hartford Eastern Railway  181
Gas Cars  181
Appendix C: Bridges and Other Landmarks197
Bridges  197
Milepost Listing of Bridges and Other Landmarks 200
Appendix D: A Monte Cristo Gallery205
Appendix E: Selected Depot Maps and Drawings215
Everett Depot Area  216
Everett Smelter and Vicinity  217
Lowell Depot Area  218
Hartford Eastern Railway Connection to the                                                                        Northern Pacific Railway  219
Granite Falls  220
Robe Wye and Vicinity  221
Monte Cristo circa 1904  222
Water Tower  223
Turntable  224
Index225
DUST JACKET INTRODUCTION:
That Little Trout Stream...
The locals, including the earliest settlers, had warned them: The South Fork of the Stillaguamish River can turn from a picturesque waterway into a raging torrent in short order.
"Nonsense," said the engineers, pointing out to the locals that they'd been building railroads along eastern waterways for decades. This "little trout stream" was no different, and the railroad was going in.
The railroad did go in, and every subsequent year brought a Chinook in the fall or a heavy snow runoff in the spring, turning the "Stilly" into a furious torrent and damaging or destroying pieces of the railroad, especially in the notorious Robe Canyon. The crews barely had enough time to complete repairs before Mother Nature would strike again.
The Everett and Monte Cristo line came about as the major railroads were looking for a terminus in the Puget Sound area. It was meant to provide access to the newly discovered mineral resources in the remote area known as Monte Cristo, the site of Washington State's gold rush. The gold frenzy went bust in just a few short years, but the line found a new purpose in hauling timber for the logging companies that had worked their way into the mountains. It also enjoyed a brisk passenger business, and in its final years as the Hartford Eastern Railway even sported its own resort destination, the Inn at Big Four.
But the combination of natural disaster, economic woes, financial shenanigans, and ultimately the coming of the automobile spelled the end for the railroad. Nevertheless, the line left an indelible mark on the region, and its fascinating and colorful story is an important chapter in the state's history. Even today, the Monte Cristo area remains as mysterious and inviting as it was when the first prospectors combed its high peaks looking for that telltale glint of gold.


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