Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun

Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun

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Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Vol 3 Robert Yanosey PA OH IN IL Morning Sun
 
Erie Railroad Facilities in Color Volume 3 By Robert Yanosey Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois
Morning Sun Books
Copyright 2007 FIRST PRINTING   
128 pages
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAIN LINE -MEADVILLE DIVISION 6
Corry   6
Corry Railway Express Building    7
EYE Interlocking   7
Union City Crossing Gate House 8
Union City Freighthouse    9
Millers Station    9
Meadville     10
Meadville Yard 12
Meadville Terminal Building  13
Meadville Freighthouse 13
Meadville Diesel Shop  14
Meadville Coaling Station  15
Meadville Back Shop18
BK Tower 20
Greenville 21
XN Tower 21
MAIN LINE -MAHONING DIVISION 24
Sharpsville  24
Ferrona Yard 24
Ferrona Yard Office 24
Sharon 25
Hubbard 26
VY Tower 27
HM Tower30
Youngstown Terminal Building  31
Westlakes Crossing Gate Tower  34
Signal 65-1M 35
Brier Hill Diesel Shops 35
Niles 37
P Tower37
Warren 38
Warren Freighthouse 39
SN Tower 40
Leavittsburg Engine Terminal  44
Braceville Wig-Wag Signal  45
Ravenna 45
MAIN LINE - KENT DIVISION 46
Kent Yard 46
Kent46
Akron Yard Office 48
Akron Freighthouse49
JO Tower 49
Barberton 50
Wadsworth 50
Signal 628-2 50
RU Tower 51
Creston Tower 54
Burt Tower 55
Galion 55
Martel Tower 56
MAIN LINE - MARION DIVISION 58
Marion 58
Marion Union Depot Hotel 61
AC Tower 64
Marion Westbound Signal Bridge   65
Marion Eastbound Signal Bridge     66
Kenton Avenue Crossing Shanty    67
Marion Engine Terminal 68
Marion Diesel Shops 70
Marion Yard72
Marion Hump Office72
Kenton74
HN Tower 75
Harrods 76
SJ Tower 76
Lima 80
Lima Freighthouse    81
Ohio City 82
Decatur 82
Kingsland 82
GS Tower 83
Little Wabash River Bridge 84
WR Tower85
Huntington Hotel Building 86
Huntington 89
Huntington Yard 92
Huntington Crossing Shanty 92
Huntington Shops Building 93
Huntington Scale House 93
Leiters 94
Monterey94
Kouts Tower 95
Kouts 95
Griffith 96
GF Tower 97
Hammond98
Hammond Yard 98
Hohman Avenue Crossing Tower 99
Hohman Tower99
ED Drawbridge 99
CHICAGO & WESTERN INDIAN, RAILROAD  I00
State Line Tower  100
Burnham Tower 102
Pullman Junction  102
74th Street  104
Englewood  104
51st Street Yard 105
21st Street Tower 105
18th Street Bridge  105
14th Street Freighthouse  106
Dearborn Station  107
BRADFORD BRANCH - MEADVILLE DIVISION  110
Kinzua Viaduct  110
SECOND SUB-DIVISION -111
MAHONING DIVISION  111
Pymatuming Interlocking 111
Cortland  111
DAYTON BRANCH -KENT DIVISION 112
Marion  112
Urbana Freighthouse 112
Maitland Tower 113
Fairborn Freighthouse  113
Dayton Yard Office  113
FERRONA BRANCH - MAHONING DIVISION 114
New Castle  114
LISBON BRANCH - MAHONING DIVISION  114
Leetonia  114
FIRST SUB-DIVISION -MAHONING DIVISION  114
Garrettsville-Hiram114
Mantua 115
Aurora 115
Geauga Lake 116
Solon 116
North Randall  117
Lee Road118
East 55th Street  119
New Erie Caf120
East 55th Street Yard120
East 55th Street Roundhouse  121
WE Tower122
Literary Street Yard 123
River Bed Yard 123
Erie Docks 124
Terminal Tower 126
ERIE REBORN IN THE MIDWEST     128

To understand the Erie Railroad in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, one must first consider the road's New York roots, for from there grew the rest of the road. In 1833, when the New York State legislature debated an "intra-state railroad system" it seemed like an easier answer to thorny political problems, an innovative alternative to yet another cross-state canal. After all, railroading was the cutting edge 19th Century industrial technology, certainly a marked improvement over another big ditch. Four years previous in 1829, New Yorker Peter Cooper was even forced to take his ideas south for more receptive pastures ultimately astonishing onlookers with Tom Thumb outside of Baltimore. Nascent railroading was springing up seemingly everywhere from Boston to South Carolina. Why not in the Empire State? So not really enthralled, the legislature did act, but parochially restricting the new venture to New York borders and even requiring six-foot gauge track to prohibit interchange with out-of-state roads. In the ensuing years it became apparent that without major change to such a plan, the Erie would be doomed.
By 1852, the young New York & Erie Railroad (and even the New York State legislature) had realized the error of its ways and began the first of several out-of-state extensions. Purchase of the Paterson and Hudson River Railroad and Paterson and Ramapo Railroad brought the road down to a more logical east end conclusion than the tiny Piermont, NY terminus on the Hudson River. On the west end, the Dunkirk, NY terminal proved just as unsatisfactory, so in 1861 when some Ohio businessmen began construction of an "Atlantic and Great Western Railroad" with intentions to extend west from the Erie at Salamanca, NY to Dayton, Ohio, their effort was embraced and eventually became affiliated with New York & Erie. By 1883 the A&GW was fully integrated into the Erie as its Nypano Company subsidiary. Previously, the A&GW had itself absorbed another railroad, the Cleveland & Mahoning Valley, the Cleveland-Youngstown trackage of which would someday become the "breadbasket" of the Erie, the source of its most lucrative traffic. Erie's "Chicago & Erie" extension west to the many interchanges in the Windy City took place in 1880, relatively late in railroad-building terms, but with that Erie assumed most of its modern-age size, with just about equal amounts of trackage inside as well as outside the Empire State. For those interested in intrigue, no better recounting of the details of Erie's often painful growth can be found than Edward Hungerford's 1946 epic Men of Erie.

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