Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby
Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby
Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby
Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby
Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby
Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby

Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant A History by James Filby

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Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant A History by James Filby
 
Credit Valley Railway The Third Giant  A History by James Filby
The Boston Mills Press, 1974.  107 pages.

Illustrated with black & white photographs, maps, drawings etc. Includes appendix & bibliography.  
Approx 5.5x8.25

CONTENTS
Early Canada west transportation
The coming of the railway era
Railway acts of the 1800s
George Laidlaw the prince of bonus hunters
The credit valley railway: charter, promotion & financing
Work begins
Bridges on the C.V.R.
Difficulties and Controversies
Legal entanglement & the Toronto entry
Opening the line
Riding the train
Cars and Track
Railway People
End of rail
Epilogue

EARLY CANADA WEST TRANSPORTATION
To a country with the physical shape of Canada, stretching thousands of miles from Atlantic to Pacific and settled on a relatively narrow frontier, cheap and rapid communication is an important requisite for growth.
The existence of conveniences of telephone and telegraph, radio and television, airline and superhighway, bus and turbotrain, makes it difficult to appreciate the immense inconveniences and hardships from the lack of such means of communication and transportation in pioneer days.
A simple thing like mailing a letter from York (Toronto), to England cost nearly six shillings in 1809, would take sixteen to eighteen days just to travel from York to Quebec City, the balance of the journey by boat as long as a month, and in many instances a two day trip over difficult trails was necessary just to post the mail. In 1816 there were but ten post offices in the whole of Lower Canada and nine in Upper Canada.
Great natural highways of lakes and rivers gave Canada a large advantage over many other parts of the continent in the earlier periods of settlement. Use of the waterways, was not without drawbacks, however, for in making their way to the oceans, these waters dropped from lake level to lake level, over cataracts and rapids, formidable interruptions. Long and arduous portages were necessary before the construction of canals and locks, and for many years, the birchbark canoe was the main mode of travel.
Even by 1826 to reach the sea, the traveller or export merchandise still had to portage, between Kingston and Montreal, the river barrier formed by the rapids on the St. Lawrence River. Similarly, a barrier existed at the Niagra River and once again goods or persons had to
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