Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks

Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks

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Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color Bob Withers Morning Sun Bks
 
Baltimore & Ohio Through Passenger Service In Color By Bob Withers
Hard Cover with Dust Jacket
Morning Sun Books
128 pages
Copyright 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: THE NATIONAL LIMITED 4-22
Chapter 2: THE CAPITOL LIMITED, COLUMBIAN and AMBASSADOR23-58
Chapter 3: CAPITOL COMPANIONS 59-79
Chapter 4: THE METROPOLITAN SPECIAL80-95
Chapter 5: THE CINCINNATIAN96-111
Chapter 6: THE ROYAL BLUE LINE112-114
Chapter 7: RUNNING MATES115-128
INTRODUCTION
By far, my railfan hobby's favorite aspect is passenger trains - not so much pacing them, as many fellow fans prefer, but riding on them. And studying their consists, history and development over the years.
Yes, I love steam locomotives, but I missed seeing most of them in action. I liked visiting small-town stations and towers to hobnob with ticket agents and operators, but the vast majority of them went away early in my life, too. I even appreciated how a good caboose ride made me feel like an insider, but nowadays the few of them that remain are used as mere shoving platforms in short territories woven in and around industrial plants.
But I can still ride passenger trains - and ruminate about how life must have been when the vast majority of Americans patronized them to get from Point A to Point B. I don't care for long automobile trips with the increasing congestion and growing number of oversized and aggressive rigs crowding me on the country's interstate system. I can barely tolerate squeezing into a bus seat, and I flat-out refuse to fly headlong through the skies six miles above the scenery in a craft that can be brought to an untimely end by some nut hiding explosive materials in his underwear.
All I want when I travel is a chance to see America's fruited plains, alabaster cities and purple mountain majesties in comfort. I hold in great esteem the privilege of getting up and walking the stiffness out of my aging joints whenever I want, eating a decent meal without enduring the rain, cold or snow, and - this is the best part - going to sleep in a comfy sleeping car room in one town and waking up in another. Or, raising the shade in the middle of the night and watching the nocturnal world whiz by my window while I'm still stretched out.
Thankfully, I managed to ride all the lines of my favorite railroad, B&O, upon which passenger services were available after April 28, 1958 - Baltimore to St. Louis, Cumberland to Chicago, and Cincinnati to Toledo - and many of the secondary lines, too, if I count Budd cars, excursions, mixed trains, Amtrak's CARDINAL, CSX Transportation's track geometry train and high-rail trucks.
But precious few of those trips were done in the style I liked best - aboard Pullman sleeping cars. The journals I have composed over more than 40 years include 53 nights and part-nights aboard sleepers on 18 railroads covering thousands of miles from Oregon to Florida and Quebec to Texas and California. But only a handful of those trips were on B&O - a bedroom aboard sleeper/observation Maumee River on Train #2-32 from Parkersburg to Baltimore on September 1-2, 1966; a roomette on 10-roomette/6-double-bedroom sleeper Allegheny on Train #7 from Washington to Pittsburgh on October 7-8, 1967; and a roomette on a borrowed Southern Pacific 10/6 car on Train #32 from Cincinnati to Washington on January 25-26, 1968. (As one who likes to keep meticulous records, I also note that I have ridden five B&O sleepers in off-line territories - including heavyweight 8-section/4-double-bedroom Emerald Waters [by then owned by the Collis P. Huntington Railroad Historical Society Inc.] and 16-duplex-roomette/4-double-bedroom Budd-built lightweights Quail, Kingfisher, Swan and Wren.)
All three of those B&O/Pullman rides offered precious memories still as fresh as this morning's breakfast. I awoke on the 1966 jaunt to find that flagman A.C. Westfall had slipped his set of train orders under my bedroom door before he got off in Cumberland. In 1967, I raised my shade just as my train stopped in Cumberland to wait for Train #I0 to leave the station, then watched it ease by my window en route to Washington. And in 1968, I awoke near Tunnelton, W.Va., well after daylight, having been delayed five hours by a set of derailed SD35 helpers, handing me a nice ride along many miles normally not seen in daylight, and after a full night's rest at that!
Anyway, following the American passenger train's savage retrenchment once Amtrak took over several intercity routes and chopped off the rest, my passenger train passion shifted largely into a research mode - exploring the history of long-cherished luxury runs, digging out little-known nuggets about feeder trains and filing away anecdotal data about trips enjoyed by others.
Apparently I had a lot of company. Enthusiasts fanned out across the land to capture celluloid images of rail travel - and thus retain for us their memory in perpetuity. As this book shows, many of them flocked to B&O rights of way, preserving on film such magnificent carriages as THE NATIONAL and CAPITOL LIMITEDS, THE CINCINNATIAN, THE ROYAL BLUE, and other B&O flagships. Those of us among the younger set appreciate their efforts. And now, you can, too, as you thumb through these pages.
And, perhaps, when you do, you will come to agree with those of us who say, in the words of Edna St. Vincent Millay, ...there isn't a train 1 wouldn't take, No matter where it's going."
Bob Withers
April 2010


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