Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket

Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket

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Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by Cook & Coxey w dust jacket
 
Atlantic City Railroad The Royal Route To the Sea by W George Cook & William J Coxey
A history of the Reading's Seashore Railroad 1877-1933
Hard Cover with dust jacket
Copyright 1980
172 pages

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgements  Page 4
Introduction  5
Narrow Gauge Rails to the Beach 1877-1883  6
Other Ancestors:
The Williamstown Railroad  18
The Camden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim Railway  26
Conversion to Standard Gauge 1883-1889  32
Competition and Achievement 1889-1901  40
The Brigantine Beach Railroad  57
Extension into Cape May County  62
Fast and Dependable 1901-1916  76
Changing Times 1917-1933  112
The Delaware River Ferry Company  154
Station List  164
Locomotive Roster  166
Bibliography  172
Abbreviations of Company Names  172
Index  173
Early entrepreneurs recognized the business potential of a coastal resort within easy reach of the Philadelphia-Camden area. However, one-hundred and twenty-five years ago an all-day stage coach ride precluded the possibility of spending a day by the sea. After the first railroad, the Camden and Atlantic Rail Road, was opened to Atlantic City in 1854, the seashore became a very popular mecca for residents of the Philadelphia area. The outstanding success of the resort resulted in two more railroads being built over the next forty years.
The second railroad to serve Atlantic City was a hastily constructed narrow gauge line, which was completed in 1877. Providing only the crudest of accommodations for passengers, the company quickly failed. In 1883 the Philadelphia & Reading acquired control and promptly began to rebuild the entire railroad. With plans for more than a seasonal excursion line, the seashore railroad was standard-gauged the following year. Five years later it was the first line between Camden and Atlantic City to operate a stone-ballasted double-track main line. New luxuriously fitted passenger cars, hauled by high-speed anthracite burning locomotives, provided a first class service year round.
Introduction
During the summer months the City of Philadelphia, like other eastern inland metropolitan areas, is often very warm and humid with little air movement. When prolonged periods of warm muggy weather occur, the City becomes virtually unbearable. Before the advent of airconditioning, about the only way one could achieve some degree of comfort was by actually leaving the sweltering urban area. While nearby parks and lakes were popular, the seashore with its cool ocean and refreshing breeze could provide the ultimate relief. However, 125 years ago an all-day stage coach ride precluded the possibility of spending a day by the sea. Early entrepreneurs recognized the potential of a coastal resort within easy reach of the Philadelphia-Camden area. After the first railroad, the Camden and Atlantic Rail Road, was opened to Atlantic City in 1854, the seashore became a very popular mecca for residents of the Philadelphia area. The outstanding success of the resort resulted in two more railroads being built over the next forty years.
The second railroad to serve Atlantic City was the Philadelphia and Atlantic City Railway. This hastily constructed narrow gauge line, which was completed in 1877, provided only the crudest of accommodations for passengers and consequently quickly failed. In 1883 the Philadelphia & Reading, later to become the Reading Company, acquired control of the bankrupt company and promptly began to rebuild the entire railroad. With plans for more than a mere excursion line, the railroad was standard gauged the following year and five years later became the first line between Camden and Atlantic City to operate a stone-ballasted double-track main line. New luxuriously fitted passenger cars, hauled by high-speed anthracite burning locomotives, provided a first class service all year long.
At first passengers were required to spend over two hours traveling between Philadelphia and the shore. By 1891 the scheduled time for express trains was reduced to 73 minutes including the ferry trip across the Delaware River. Intense competition for the seashore trade developed well before the turn of the century between the Philadelphia & Reading and the Pennsylvania Railroad. Both companies developed highspeed locomotives and maintained flawless track and roadbed, each trying ever so hard to surpass the other. In fact, the extraordinary efforts of these two major eastern railroads brought about some of the world's fastest running shortly after the turn of the century.
By the late 1890's, the Reading's southern New Jersey operations included not only a branch serving the thriving industrial and agricultural region between Atco and Mullica Hill and the short suburban line to Grenloch, but were expanded to the seashore resorts of Ocean City, Sea Isle City and Cape May. A dozen years later the Reading also served Wildwood and Stone Harbor by means of connecting short line companies.
Even though the railroads did an outstanding job handling the seashore crowds, by the 1920's the growing popularity of highway travel caused passenger traffic to gradually decline. This work describes the formation, growth, operation and decline of the Reading Company's Atlantic City Railroad.

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