Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket

Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket

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Ahoy & Farewell II The Marine Historical Society of Detroit w/ dust jacket
 
Ahoy & Farewell 2
The Marine Historical Society of Detroit  First edition
Hard Cover with Dust Jacket
244 pages
Copyright 1996

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ROGER BLOUGHFront Cover
Skip Meier photo taken at the Rock Cut, St. Marys River, August 1, 1991
Introduction
Acknowledgmentsv
Glossary vii
Ahoy - 1969 through 1994 1
Farewell - 1969 through 1994 41
Museum Ships199
Marine Gallery207
Index 237
WILLIAM G. MATHER & ROBERT C. STANLEYBack Cover
Bill Luke photo taken from the Blue Water Bridge, October, 1972
INTRODUCTION
In 1954, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit, Inc. celebrated its tenth anniversary by printing a special "Farewell" supplement to its monthly publication, The Detroit Marine Historian, briefly detailing those Great Lakes vessels which had been wrecked, abandoned, or sent off lakes since the Society's inception in 1944. In 1955, another special supplement was produced which "Ahoyed" those Great Lake ships which had been built for or arrived on the Lakes during the previous 11 year period. Subsequently in 1969, the Society celebrated its 25th anniversary by printing the first combined volume of "Ahoy and Farewell" which covered the 14-15 year period since the previous supplements were published. Carrying on this tradition, it was decided to commemorate our 50th anniversary by publishing the second "Ahoy and Farewell" chronicling the 25 year period from 1969 through 1994 and the numerous changes that have occurred in both the U.S. and Canadian Great Lake fleets.
The ships that are chronicled in this volume, with a few exceptions, include only those vessels that at some time in their history were powered and had a minimum of 1,000 gross registered tons. To include all vessels that were "ahoyed" or "farewelled" during the last 25 years would have made this book too large and too expensive. New to this lineage of Ahoy and Farewell is a Museum Ship section which details current ships on display around the Great Lakes that had served on the Lakes. Approximately twenty bulk carriers that are either inactive or are being used as storage hulls on the Great Lakes are not included in this book since their final disposition was not known as of December 31, 1994, the cut off date for inclusion in this book.
This effort has evolved into a conscientious attempt to include a comprehensive history of each ship. Sometimes so much subject matter was available that backlogs and discrepancies resulted. When this occurred, Lloyd's Registry of Ships, American Bureau of Shipping's Record, The Detroit Marine Historian or the Institute for Great Lakes Research records was used as the final authority. Though every effort was make to utilise factual, documented information, we are fully aware that some areas are still lacking. We welcome any documented input to this endeavour, as we feel that compiling history is a dynamic process and is a cooperative effort of historians and historical institutions. It is hoped what we have included herein is information that will provide a firm foundation of data for researchers and students of Great Lakes Maritime History.
The last 25 years have been marked by many changes related to the Great Lakes shipping industry of which three are especially significant: advancements related to economy of scale, improved efficiency of operation and improvements related to environmental safety. On the first point, a significant number of smaller ships became obsolete as a result of the infusion of the more economical giant super carriers in the 1970's and early 1980's. These 1,000-foot vessels could carry as much as 70,000 tons of iron ore pellets, the capacity of four or five 600-foot bulkers built during the first decades of this century. This allowed the shipping companies to transport bulk material at a fraction of the cost due to reduced crew and operating expenses. To further demonstrate this trend, the Great Lakes fleet in 1969 consisted of 355 U.S. and Canadian bulk carriers (straight deckers and self-unloaders) with a combined trip capacity of a little over 4.8 million tons. Whereas by the end of 1994, there were less than 147 ships, a reduction of 58%, that had a combined trip capacity of 3.9 million tons, a reduction of only 19%. The tanker fleet experienced similar reductions, for in 1969 that fleet consisted of 54 vessels with a combined trip capacity of approximately 2.27 million barrels of petroleum products. By the end of 1994, this segment had been reduced to a total of 21 powered tankers, a reduction of 61%, with a combined trip capacity of approximately 1.5 million barrels, a reduction of 33.9%. A portion of the reduction in bulk and liquid cargo capacity however has been made up recently by a increased use of integrated tug/barge carriers. The 1,000-foot PRESQUE ISLE, ST. MARY'S CEMENT II (496'6" LOA), AMOCO GREAT LAKES (414' LOA) are only a few examples of this trend. The MEDUSA CONQUEST, JOSEPH H. THOMPSON and McKEE SONS are examples of barges that were converted from powered hulk carriers. Economies of reduced crew and separated diesel power are realised and point to an inevitable sign of the future. In addition to this trend, the rail ferry service on the Great Lakes had disappeared by 1994, due in large part to the expansion of tunnel rail service under Detroit and St. Clair Rivers and the elimination of rail service in the Straits of Mackinac and across Lake Michigan
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