North American Railroads Today By G F Allen Dust Jacket

North American Railroads Today By G F Allen Dust Jacket Copyright 1990 123 Pages North American railroading today is the invigorating story of a great industry's resurgence, weathering a recent recession deep enough to have brought about a wave of major system bankruptcies had it hit ten years ago. So far as the major US railroads are concerned, it is a tale of steady technical and operating improvements, exploiting every possible application of the hectic advance in electronics technology. Control of traffic and equipment has been tightened by computer-based data transmission systems, by computerized aid for dispatchers, automated sorting of trains in classification yards, and a wide range of ancillary equipment, such as electronic devices employing voice synthesizers which radio to engineers or control centers precise, spoken warnings of overheated axleboxes they have detected in passing trains. The latest diesel locomotives are not only a substantial degree more energy-efficient than those of only a decade ago, but they also maximize the potential of electronics to improve performance and simplify maintenance in thoroughly efficient order. They have much better track to travel on, thanks to the millions of dollars recently invested in sophisticated, labor-saving machines to perform every kind of track maintenance, and plowed in to a sustained high level of track renewal. Helped by Washington's dismantling the passenger train dead, least of all in the big cities, where new building of rapid transit lines is at one of the highest levels in the world. The intriguing question, though, is which pair of, those cities will be first to enjoy a connecting high-speed rail service on a par with Europe's fastest or Japan's Shinkansen. As we enter the 1990s, such an American enterprise approaches reality of historic curbs on their commercial freedom, US railroads are not only developing impressive new hauls in their staple bulk commodity traffics like coal, but breaking more strongly by the year into the general merchandise market. This is with the piggybacking of road trailers and containers, a business in which the railroads are gaining new efficiency, on the one hand by acquiring new marketing expertise to exploit their commercial freedom, on the other by new cost-saving practices and hardware. The Canadian scene is just as exciting. With Japanese demand for minerals seemingly inexhaustible, both major Canadian railroads are spending huge sums to enlarge their transcontinental capacity and in British Columbia a railroad has been electrified to move vast tonnages of Japan-bound coal. Neither in the US nor in Canada is the passenger train dead, least of all in the big cities, where new building of rapid transit lines is at one of the highest levels in the world. The intriguing question, though, is which pair of, those cities will be first to enjoy a connecting high-speed rail service on a par with Europe's fastest or Japan's Shinkansen. As we enter the 1990s, such an American enterprise approaches reality.
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